Manchester Metropolitan University

HySchool to deliver Hydrogen education

New project from the Manchester Fuel Cell Innovation Centre

Manchester Metropolitan University’s Manchester Fuel Cell Innovation Centre is leading a partnership to deliver HySchool - an Erasmus + project that delivers hydrogen education in schools.

The University’s Faculty of Science & Engineering and its Business School are working with a consortium of seven other European partners to develop and deliver an educational programme with resources for secondary schools.

Amer Gaffar, Director of Partnerships at the Manchester Fuel Cell Innovation Centre, said: “Teaching young people about the possibilities of hydrogen is so important. We want to prepare and educate students so that by the time they reach university, they will have an understanding of the practical applications of fuel cells and hydrogen. A project like this has never been delivered before.

“The big challenge for the 21st Century is how we can create a sustainable future for these young people while meeting demand for energy, and hydrogen plays a major role in creating green and emission-free energy for the future.

The outputs

“The new HySchool project will greatly benefit Greater Manchester schools and we’re delighted to be working with them.”

The project will see the creation of resource packs for secondary schools across Manchester, which will offer practical resources for both teachers and students. Students will take part in investigations and receive demonstrations as well as exam related support.

Online resources such as podcasts and videos of global fuel cell outreach will also be developed using University expertise.

For younger students and primary schools that want to get involved, comic-based animations and online games involving fuel cells and hydrogen will be produced.

Partners

The project aims to work with schools beyond Manchester, educating students on hydrogen and fuel cells on a transnational basis.

The consortium partners are University of Lorraine (FR), Campus Belgium (BE), University of Franche Comte (FR), University of Perugia (IT), Patras Science park (GR), Maramures Energy Agency (RO) and Perugia/Abruzzo Region (IT).

Agyro Karathanou, from University of Franche Comte, commented: “We are focused on developing the next generation of scientists to ensure that the fuel cell and hydrogen sector becomes a reality.”

The Manchester Fuel Cell Innovation Centre was launched last year to research and produce advanced materials for fuel cells and next generation energy storage, utilising nanomaterials and 3D printing for example, and plan hydrogen and fuel cell infrastructure for the region.

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NOTES FOR EDITORS

For further information, please contact: Maryam Ahmed in the Manchester Metropolitan University press office on 0161 247 2181 or MAhmed@mmu.ac.uk

Subject to contract.

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