Manchester Metropolitan University

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£1m to help business growth

MANCHESTER Metropolitan is helping small business to the tune of nearly £1 million after winning a grant from the Northwest Regional Development Agency (NWDA).

The NWDA is spending £9.5m rolling out its Leading Enterprise and Development (LEAD) programme throughout the region.

Businesses across Greater Manchester have been selected for the training based on their potential to grow and create jobs and wealth.

Growth will be supported by giving owner-managers the most up-to-date leadership and management training from academics and experts in their field.

Proven results

The agency said that a pilot scheme had delivered "proven results", with 90 per cent of the 150 businesses completing achieving an average annual sales increase of £200,000.

"Organisations have recognised leadership and management as a priority to enhance productivity and competitiveness, and over the last 20 years have devoted substantial resources to this," said NWDA chief executive Steven Broomhead.

"In contrast, engagement by small and medium sized enterprises is often limited by time and financial constraints, however better skills at higher levels drive leadership and management, which are the key drivers of growth and profit."

Past delegate Michael Gray of 1st Stop Finance said that the course had helped his firm to achieve a "four-fold" increase in turnove: “To grow as rapidly as we did, while also increasing profits is a difficult balancing act, but LEAD helped us to implement effective policies allowing us to achieve the right balance."

MMU Business School

In Greater Manchester, the programme will now be delivered by MMU, along with Knowledge Transfer International Ltd, The Manufacturing Institute (TPMI Trading) Ltd and the University of Salford.

MMU’s specialist Centre for Enterprise, at the University’s Business School, will manage the LEAD project.

For more about LEAD and other business support projects, go to the Centre for Enterprise website.

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