BSc (Hons) Adult Nursing

“It is a great confidence booster when
you progress into practice and suddenly realise
how much you have learned.”

About My Degree

I chose Nursing because helping people has always been my passion. I am huge fan of volunteering and fundraising for charities and have volunteered in orphanages and refugee camps in South East Asia and even helped build houses in Sri Lanka after the tsunami of 2005. Although I had no traditional healthcare experience when applying for university, supporting and. I was determined to retrain as an Adult Nurse and do what I really love as a profession.

I love the variety of the course. There is something for everyone, even if like me, you are not sure what nursing field you ultimately want to go into. The nature of the Nursing programme at MMU allows students to challenge themselves in a supportive environment by trying out new areas and viewing nursing in different ways.

The lecturers are engaging, warm, supportive and incredibly knowledgeable. Most Nursing lecturers at MMU still practice and do shifts in their specialist areas. This gives me a lot of confidence that what we are being taught is up to date and relevant and realistic in practice. I think that ultimately, this makes us better prepared for work upon registration.

Tutors are also allocated for every assignment as a point of contact to address any concerns or questions. In addition, the librarians are incredibly helpful, and the Faculty offers workshops and one-to-one support to help with other aspects of assignments and presentations.

In practice, there are mentors on placement who have direct responsibility for students and practice education facilitators (PEFs) who liaise with the university.

The programme at MMU is relevant and current. The clinical skills are backed up with practical experience within a competencies-based framework, meaning that progression relies on achievement of specific minimum standards. It shows that nursing students do not only display core values and behaviours (6Cs) but that we are competent and able. We also gain a lot of transferable skills during the course that enhance our employability. For example communication (with distressed patients), time management (managing full time shift patterns), research skills (evidence for practice), leadership (change management) and organisation (care and nursing plans). 

What is your top tip for other students looking to study this course at Manchester Metropolitan University?

Speak to the admission tutors on the phone or better still, go to one of the Open Days! Getting a feel for a place is invaluable, once you’ve been to MMU, you won’t want to go anywhere else! 

Please complete this sentence: ‘I’m inspired by…’

The lecturers. They are incredibly knowledgeable. Most Nursing lecturers at MMU still practice and do shifts in their specialist areas. This gives me a lot of confidence that what we are being taught is up to date and relevant and realistic in practice. I think that ultimately, this makes us better prepared for work upon registration.

What do you love about MMU?

Everything and more! I knew that I wanted to do Adult Nursing and I knew that I wanted to come to MMU. The programme has really allowed me to embrace Nursing. Following on from my first year of the programme, and with the backing of my tutors I have won 2 national essay competitions, MMU’s Ede & Ravenscroft Award for Academic Excellence and this year I became a finalist in the Cavell Nurses’ Trust Outstanding Academic Achievement Award. I couldn’t have done it if it wasn’t for the course, the support and the tutors. The course is entirely what you make of it, the potential is there to really shine and make a true different to patients, other students, the university and the Nursing Profession as a whole! 

About My Placement

As part of a Nursing degree, we spend 50% of our time (around 24 weeks per year) on placement. I have been lucky to have had practical experience and exposure in areas such as medical and surgical wards, theatres, A&E, cardiac rehabilitation, podiatry, dietetics, district nursing, health visiting, oncology, palliative care and mental health.

Each placement is different but they are all inspiring and insightful. I always learn from every single placement, whether the focus is on learning new clinical skills or new ways of communicating with others, Every placement is an opportunity to learn and develop. It is also a confidence-booster when you progress through placements and you suddenly realise how much you have learnt.

The first time I got called ‘Nurse’ by a patient (even whilst wearing a student uniform) is an experience I will never forget. Undergoing placements not only allows you to meet, care for and nurse an incredible variety of patients, but it also allows you to meet other students and network with other health professionals.