Manchester Metropolitan University

BA (Hons)

English degrees with a Foundation Year (Stream A)

2017 entry

Features and benefits of the course

  • Each year we accept hundreds of students onto Foundation Year courses who have the ability to study at degree level but who don’t have the qualifications to enter directly onto an honours degree. 
  • Has content that is tailored so that it is appropriate to your chosen degree.
  • Helps you to develop the study skills and academic knowledge you will need to start Year 1 of your course with confidence

About the course

Typical units of study may include

Year 1

All Humanities Foundation Year students study the Academic Practice for the Humanities and Social Sciences unit, which will help you to develop the academic and study skills required for degree-level work. You will also study topics in Approaches to English, Modern Britain since 1945 (with or without Uniwide Language option) and an Introduction to Languages, Culture and Linguistics.

International students are placed on the Foundation Year International Route which offers additional English language study skills and tutor support through the English and Academic Study unit. This unit will replace Introduction to Languages, Culture and Linguistics.

Teaching is delivered via a range of methods including lectures, seminars, tutorials and, where appropriate, practical workshops, PC lab sessions, and online learning. Teaching methods depend on your chosen linked honours degree and you should expect to spend some time each week in independent study.

Successful completion of the Foundation Year guarantees automatic progression onto Year 1 of the degree you have chosen to study.

Core Units
Academic Practice for the Humanities and Social Sciences

This unit aims to help students make a successful transition to higher education study, developing the skills required for the study of humanities and social science disciplines. These include independent learning, time management, note-taking, academic writing, critical thinking and writing, referencing methods, exam techniques, oral presentations, research skills, information literacy, digital literacy/ICT - word-processing, spread-sheets and databases.

Approaches to English

Using a variety of genres and literary forms, including that of creative writing, this unit introduces students to the foundations of the study of English. The unit will engage specifically with what genre means as well as with the issues entailed in finding a dividing line between creative and critical practice. Students will explore the novel, poetry and plays in the English and American traditions, as well as film and visual culture and the practice of creative writing.

English for Academic Study (for International Students only)

The course develops language skills in Academic English, notably writing and speaking, to give you confidence in written assessment and oral presentation. A further focus is listening and note-taking, for ease in following lectures. The development of reading, to aid analysis and interpretation of course material, will also feature, and the unit will additionally develop study skills, to assist you in the transition to Higher Education study.

Introduction to Language, Culture and Linguistics

Students will engage with a wide variety of topics related to aspects of language, culture, and linguistics with a view to developing a critical awareness and understanding. This unit seeks to cover broad ground in aspects of the humanities and deals with many key areas of culture and mass communication, including newspapers, television, film, fiction, and popular music. It also looks at more specific aspects of human communication by focusing on issues within language and linguistics.

Modern Britain since 1945

This unit aims to give you an understanding of key themes in British culture, society and politics since 1945. In particular, it examines: the position of Britain at the end of the Second World War; the rise of 'youth culture'; the changing role of women; developments in immigration and race relations; the British economy; politics in Northern Ireland; the welfare state; employment and unemployment; the 1960s and the so-called 'sexual revolution'; Thatcher and Thatcherism; the rise of New Labour; alternative politics, pressure groups and popular campaigns. The unit is taught through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials and workshops and makes use of British film. 

Likely Optional Units
Uniwide Language (15 credits)

You can add a foreign language to your portfolio of skills. Enhance your employability by learning Classical Latin, English (as a foreign language), French, German, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin Chinese, Modern Standard Arabic, Spanish or Urdu alongside your main degree. Whatever your language knowledge, from beginner to advanced, these classes will take you to the next level of proficiency.

Programme Review

Each programme of study that we offer undergoes an annual review to ensure an up-to-date curriculum supported by the latest online learning technology. In addition, we undertake a major review of the programme, normally at 6-yearly intervals, but this can take place at a more frequent interval where required. Applicants should note that the programme currently provided may be subject to change as a result of the review process. We only make changes where we consider it necessary to do so or where we feel that certain changes are in the best interests of students and to enhance the quality of provision. Occasionally, we have to make changes for reasons outside our control. Where there are changes which may materially affect the current programme content and/or structure, offer holders will be informed.

Assessment Weightings and Contact Hours

10 credits equates to 100 hours of study, which is a combination of lectures, seminars and practical sessions, and independent study. A 3 year degree qualification typically comprises 360 credits (120 credits per year). The exact composition of your study time and assessments for the course will vary according to your option choices and style of learning, but it could be:

Study
  • Year 1 20% lectures, seminars or similar; 80% independent study
  • Year 2 15% lectures, seminars or similar; 85% independent study
  • Year 3 20% lectures, seminars or similar; 80% independent study
  • Year 4 15% lectures, seminars or similar; 85% independent study
Assessment
  • Year 1 75% coursework; 25% examination
  • Year 2 75% coursework; 25% examination
  • Year 3 60% coursework; 40% examination
  • Year 4 60% coursework; 40% examination

Teaching Staff

Your studies are supported by a team of committed and enthusiastic teachers and researchers, experts in their chosen field. We also work with external professionals, many of whom are Manchester Met alumni, to enhance your learning and appreciation of the wider subject. Details of departmental staff can be found at: http://www2.mmu.ac.uk/english/staff/

Typical entry requirements

UCAS Tariff points/Grades required

72-80

Minimum of 72 at A2 or equivalent (such as BTEC National at Level 3, Advanced Diploma or CACHE Level 3) .

Specific GCSE requirements

GCSE English Language and Mathematics at grade D or grade 3. Equivalent qualifications (eg. Functional Skills) may be considered

Non Tariffed Qualifications

Access to HE Diploma in a relevant subject with at least 45 credits at Level 3. At least 24 credits at Merit or equivalent

International Baccalaureate points

24

IELTS score required for international students

5.5 with no less than 5.5 in any component

There’s further information for international students on our international website if you’re applying with non-UK qualifications.

How do I apply for this course?

Applications through UCAS

Remember to use the correct institution code for Manchester Metropolitan University on your application: our institution code is M40

Open Days

Come and find out more about this course and our facilities at our open days.

Book now for the:

Manchester Open Day Wednesday 21st June

Confirmation of Regulator

The Higher Education Funding Council for England is the principal regulator for the University.

Important Notice

This online prospectus provides an overview of our programmes of study and the University. We regularly update our online prospectus so that our published course information is accurate and up to date. Please note that our programmes are subject to review and development on an ongoing basis. Changes may sometimes be necessary. For example, to comply with the requirements of professional or accrediting bodies or as a result of student feedback or external examiners’ reports. We also need to ensure that our courses are dynamic and current and that the content and structure maintain academic standards and enhance the quality of the student experience.

Please check back to the online prospectus before making an application to us.

The provision of education by the University is subject to terms and conditions of enrollment and contract. The current Terms and Conditions Applicable to the provision of the University’s Educational Services are available online. When a student enrolls with us, their study and registration at the University will be governed by various regulations, policies and procedures. It is important that applicants/students familiarize themselves with our Terms and Conditions and the Key Contract Documents referred to within. Applicants will be provided with access to an up to date version at offer stage. This can be found within the Information for Offer Holders document.

Undergraduate Study