Organisations We Work With

We currently work with the following organisations. If you would like to be involved in the work of the Centre please contact us.

NAYJ (National Association of Youth Justice)

NAYJhttp://thenayj.org.uk

The National Association for Youth Justice (NAYJ) is the only membership organisation which exclusively campaigns for the rights of and justice for children and young people in trouble with the law.

NAYJ was formed in 1995 following the amalgamation of two existing organisations, the Association for Youth Justice and the National Intermediate Treatment Federation and in 2010 became a registered charity.

NAYJ seeks to promote the welfare of children and young people in the Youth Justice system in England by campaigning, lobbying, publishing practice and policy papers and providing training events and conferences.

Statement of Purpose

The purpose of the NAYJ is to promote the rights of, and justice for, children in trouble.

Manchester Youth Council

Manchester youth Councilhttp://www.manchesteryouthcouncil.co.uk/

‌We are a group of democratically elected young people who represent our peers Manchester wide. We are always recruiting young people from different areas, backgrounds, faiths and communities across Manchester. Our young people are aged 13-24 and come from many different groups such as: Youth Panels, Voice box, Schools, Colleges and voluntary groups from across Manchester.

We have our own designated Meeting room and Office at Manchester Town Hall, Room 137 (behind the Lloyd Street entrance reception desk on the ground floor). Our office is vibrant and a young person friendly environment to come and meet and work in. It has a beautiful view overlooking Albert Square.

Youth Justice Board

YJBhttps://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/youth-justice-board-for-england-and-wales/about

We oversee the youth justice system in England and Wales. We work to prevent children and young people under 18 from offending or re-offending. We ensure custody is safe and secure, and addresses the causes of their offending behaviour. We are an organisation of around 230 people. Our headquarters are in London, and we have regional offices throughout England and Wales.

Within England and Wales we're responsible for:

Overseeing youth justice services
The placing of children and young people remanded or sentenced to custody
Advising the Secretary of State for Justice on the operation of, and standards for, the youth justice system
Providing a ‘secure estate’ for children and young people, with young offender institutions, secure training centres and secure children’s homes
Making grants to local authorities or other bodies for the development of plans that support our targets
Commissioning and publishing research on preventing youth offending
From 2014 to 2015, our priorities will be to:

Positive Steps

positive Stepshttp://www.positive-steps.org.uk/

Positive Steps provides a range of targeted and integrated services to young people and adults designed to get them on the right track and fulfil their potential.

Manchester Histories

Manchester Historieshttps://manchesterhistories.co.uk/

Manchester Histories is a charity that delivers projects, events and activities with communities that reveal, share and celebrate Greater Manchester's diverse histories and heritage.

Manchester Secondary PRU

MSPRUhttp://www.mspru.manchester.sch.uk/

When a pupil is having difficulties in a mainstream school and might be (or has been) permanently excluded they may be referred to the Pupil Referral Unit or PRU for short.

The PRU is a school. We teach the same National Curriculum and offer the same level of qualifications as a mainstream school. However, as well as the academic work we help pupils address their emotional and behavioural barriers to learning. We work with pupils “one to one” or in small groups to address their individual needs.

Students are based in in centres with around 16 pupils. These centres are spread throughout the city and work with only one key stage level of learning

Each centre has experienced teachers and support staff who work with other professionals and services to provide a wrap round service to help your child develop and meet their specific needs. For example, our centre staff are qualified youth workers trained to deal specifically with the issues being a teenager brings.

Comic Relief

Comic Reliefhttps://www.comicrelief.com/

Our vision is to create a just world free from poverty. We’re doing this by funding and investing in amazing organisations across the UK and around the world. We fund a huge variety of organisations, each one working to tackle the key issues of our time.

‌Sport Relief

Sport Reliefhttps://www.sportrelief.com/

Sport Relief is when the British public comes together to get active, raise money and change lives.

Comeback Industries Copenhagen

Comeback programmehttp://comeback.nu/en/

‌Comeback Program + Industries offers marginalised young men a unique and proven development programme. We offer a community much like the one they know from the street, only our has constructive values. 

Multicultural Arts Victoria

MAV logohttps://multiculturalarts.com.au/

Multicultural Arts Victoria (MAV) has evolved over four decades into one of Australia’s most important bodies for the discovery, development and promotion of culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) contemporary art, heritage and cultural expression. Over 1 million participants are engaged in our program which includes long-term initiatives for career development and creative capacity building for over 2,000 artists and 500 communities from diverse and emerging backgrounds. The organisation also offers expertise in audience development, community engagement and artistic excellence with CALD communities.

The Children's Society

Childrens Sochttps://www.childrenssociety.org.uk/

We are a national charity that works with the country's most vulnerable children and young people. We listen. We support. We act. Because no child should feel alone.

Greater Manchester Youth Justice Services

Working together to deliver first class services to young people, victims, families and communities involved in the criminal justice system. The group comprises of ten local authority areas each individually responsible for statutory delivery of youth justice, including safeguarding and protection of the public. The strategic aims are to reduce reoffending, first time entrants into the criminal justice system and the use of custody in line with the objectives of the Youth Justice Board and Ministry of Justice. This work also addresses issues specific to Greater Manchester and is informed by academic research.

This collaborative approach is supported by the Youth Justice Board, Ministry of Justice and Greater Manchester Mayor’s Office

Young Manchester

https://www.youngmanchester.org/

YM logoManchester is a young, vibrant city. Over 40% of the population is under 35. Manchester is booming and yet 1 in 3 children live in poverty and austerity measures have impacted heavily on Youth and Play provision across the city. In an era of cutbacks, Young Manchester aims to provide children and young people in communities across the city with increased opportunities in all aspects of their life by commissioning projects that respond to their ever-changing needs.

Department for Education

https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/department-for-education

‌Arts and Humanities Research Council

http://www.ahrc.ac.uk/

Economic and Social Research Council

http://www.esrc.ac.uk/

‌Welsh Government

http://gov.wales/?lang=en