#Armistice100: our experts unearth stories and consider the legacy of the First World War

Academics evaluate how the 1914-18 conflict affected society

#Armistice100: our experts unearth the stories and consider the legacy of the First World War

#Armistice100: our experts unearth the stories and consider the legacy of the First World War

As the nation comes to mark the centenary of Armistice Day, marking the end of the First World War, academics at Manchester Metropolitan University have been revealing stories about the conflict and considering its impact on society.

Sharing their knowledge and thoughts as part of the #Armistice100 commemorative campaign, academics have been reflecting on elements such as what happened to the animals used by the armed forces during the 1914-18 conflict and how wearing the poppy has always been a political act.

On a regional level, they have examined how a hospital in Maghull became the first to treat soldiers with 'shell shock' and also how staff and students at Cheshire County Training College, which later became part of University's Cheshire campus, were involved in, and affected by, the war.

Take a look at our #Armistice100 articles:

#Armistice100: When will the industries of war fall silent?
Professor Kevin Albertson explains how the First World War has shaped economic warfare in the modern world

#Armistice100: Wearing the poppy has always been a political act – here’s why
Symbols that help a society remember war and mourn its dead are implicitly political, argues historian Dr Sam Edwards

#Armistice100: North West Film Archive's footage of life on Home Front during First World War
Public invited to view clips as centenary of end of conflict is commemorated

#Armistice100: History of first military hospital to treat soldiers with ‘shell shock’ revealed
Unearthed archive material from Moss Side Military Hospital open to public on Armistice Day

#Armistice100: What became of the war animals?
Military historian Gervase Phillips reveals the likely fate of almost one million animals involved in British armies in 1918

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