MA Bilingualism, Education and Society

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Overview

This award provides an opportunity for practitioners in a range of educational and social settings to engage in substantial continuing professional development at Masters level, and in relation to complex and changing practice environments. In a context of significant shifts in education, health and welfare services, professional enquiry is based on the idea that questions about direction and purpose ‘come with the territory’ of practice. Developing knowledge and understanding, using judgement in reflective, responsive and responsible ways, and an orientation to values of social justice, are all part of being an engaged and active(ist) professional at a time of great change and as we all, in different ways, think about how best we might proceed.

MA Bilingualism, Education and Society challenges students to think deeply about their own professional contexts and settings, their place and role within this, and the possibilities for development, change, and generating practice knowledge and innovations. 

We encourage applications from practitioners, professionals and leaders who might be working (or volunteering) in a diverse range of roles in education, health, social welfare/care, community, and other settings, and in the public, private, and voluntary or social enterprise sectors and who are interested in how bilingualism and multilingualism relate to their professional context. 

Features and Benefits

Career Prospects

MA Bilingualism, Education and Society demonstrates to employers a level of intellectual rigour, thinking at the forefront of a field of practice, and a capacity for sustained and systematic engagement. The course also places students’ continued professional development at its core and, as such, offers channels to support students’ (and their organisations) current priorities and targets. Further, the course encourages students to apply new thinking in practice in systematic and innovative/creative ways, with competence and impetus. In this way, students are able to build their reputations as systematic, evidence-driven innovators. These are all good foundations for potential promotions and progressions in professional contexts.

MA Bilingualism, Education and Society is also a good option for practitioners to develop more critical and theoretical insights about practice. If you are considering continuing with your studies on completion of your Masters by pursuing a research degree (MPhil, EdD or PhD) then you will find MA Language Education a good foundation.

Learn more about graduate careers

Entry requirements

Standard Manchester Met entry requirements for taught postgraduate programmes apply.

You also need to have experience relevant to the award area (or taking up employment or similar related to the award area).

For Further Information

Tutor Contact: Pura Ariza P.Ariza@mmu.ac.uk

Course details

MA Bilingualism, Education and Society is for a wide range of education professionals, and those in inter and multi-professional settings; the course encourages and facilitates students to identify, explore and develop thinking salient for their own practice and (academic and) professional development. 

Structure and commitment

Following enrolment, students attend an induction event. Induction includes a welcome and introduction, library and resources briefing, and academic student support session.  Further details will be available on the Welcome Website following enrolment. Please note that as well as the beginning of the academic year, it is also possible to start this MA in January (or June by request).

A full Masters is 180 credits at level 7, and at MMU this is divided in to 4 x 30 credit taught units, plus a (60 credit) dissertation. 

Each 30 credit taught unit lasts four months (units start in October, February and June) and begins with a unit conference event from 6pm Friday evening to Sunday lunchtime. Unit conferences are non-residential (and we appreciate most students like to get back to their own beds/families if possible) but good value accommodation options are available close to the Brooks Building for those students coming from distance (information on these will be provided). 

Keynote speakers will normally be timetabled for Friday evenings and will introduce issues of broad relevance and at the forefront of thinking about education and education practices. On Saturday and Sunday (morning) students will largely be working in small, award-specific groups with specialist tutors. You should leave with ideas for the assignment you will be working on!

The unit conference is followed by (a minimum of) two further (evening) group seminars/tutorials, supported by a dedicated VLE resource, and individual tutorial contact with an award tutor to support assignment work. For students at distance participation in group seminars may be possible via Skype or similar. 

Every unit offers opportunities for formative assessment – feedback on a draft or plan, before final submission. 

The dissertation is supported by individual and group supervision, a dedicated electronic resource, and group events.  

All students are also invited to our ‘MMU Postgraduate Sessions’ – monthly evening sessions where staff and doctoral students present their ongoing research (sessions are also podcasted where possible).  

For students starting in September 2018, unit conference dates are: (please note these, it’s important that students can attend):

Accreditation of Prior Learning

Students with recent (within five years) PGCE normally enter the MA Bilingualism, Education and Society with advanced standing, that is, with 60 credits. This means you will complete two taught units (including Research and Practice) before progressing to Dissertation.

Other relevant and certificated level 7 (recent) qualifications may also allow advanced standing via accreditation of prior learning procedures and you should indicate on your application form if this might apply to you.

In addition, it is possible with the agreement of your Award Tutor to incorporate recognition of prior experiential learning, that is, via relevant work experience that you may have. Further advice and guidance on this will be given by your Award Tutor after enrolment.  

Mapping the Territory: critical concepts and issues  ‘Bilingualism in society’

This unit enables a critical exploration of theory and practice and the ways these inter-relate and extend each other, for practice. There is an emphasis on participants exploring (re-looking), analysing and reflecting on theoretical, conceptual and contextual lenses and evidence salient for their own practice settings and professional priorities, to ask challenging questions, and make judgements about ‘what is going on’, where they sit, and how they might respond. Typical content might include policy perspective on issues related to bilingualism in the UK and globally, English as an Additional Language (EAL), migration, ethnic diversity, media representations of diversity and the foundations of bilingual development.

Specialist Supported Project: ‘Investigating bilingual development’

This unit supports students to undertake a project that has particular relevance to their professional practice.  Students identify and explore significant themes, issues or challenges, select a relevant focus for their project, and appropriate approach/tools/methods. The unit enables students to develop and demonstrate specialist knowledge through the use of evidence, analysis, reflection and evaluation, as appropriate to their project. The unit provides an introduction to factors that affect bilingual development and EAL, including family settings and school contexts. It will also consider the distinctive characteristics and contributions of bilingual and multilingual speakers.

Shaping the Future: ‘ Changing practice in bilingual education’

This unit asks students to address critical challenges, tensions or contradictions, and professional dilemmas within their own practice, to think forward and develop possible ways of re-framing, re-imagining, or innovating for future practice. This provides opportunities to work at the leading edge (of thinking/practice) to rethink services or approaches/interventions, to plan forward and/or to consider specific changes and innovations in language education.

Research and Practice

The unit aims to develop a greater understanding of the relevance of research to professional practice. Students examine different approaches to conducting research, and their limitations and possibilities for generating knowledge in their own practice area. The unit also explores the ethical tensions and dilemma inherent in the research process, especially those particular to practitioner research. As part of the assessment of the unit, students produce a research proposal (that can be taken forward to final dissertation) to demonstrate understanding and capacity to carry out a coherent and credible small research project.

Dissertation

This unit is designed to support and facilitate students in planning, conducting and evaluating a significant, practical and coherent (practitioner) research project. Participants finalise a research proposal for approval and for ethical clearance, and will then undertake the research project. Whilst undertaking the project students are offered tutorial support, this constitutes a blend of group tutorials as well as individual supervision. The entire process is supported by a suite of online resources as well as on-site activities that are aimed at enriching the students’ experience and improving the quality of the final dissertation.

Assessment weightings and contact hours

Study
Assessment

School of Childhood, Youth and Education Studies

Our School of Childhood, Youth and Education Studies specialises in teaching and research around education disciplines focused on children, young people, families and communities.

The department works collaboratively with communities, partners, local authorities and arts organisations on social enterprise projects, and has been at the forefront of developments in its field for over 20 years.

More about the department

Taught by experts

Your studies are supported by a team of committed and enthusiastic teachers and researchers, experts in their chosen field. We also work with external professionals, many of whom are Manchester Met alumni, to enhance your learning and appreciation of the wider subject.

Meet our expert staff

Fees

UK and EU students

UK and EU students: Part-time fee: £1084 per 30 credits studied per year. Tuition fees will remain the same for each year of your course providing you complete it in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study).

Non-EU and Channel Island students

Non-EU international and Channel Island students: Part-time fee: £2417 per 30 credits studied per year. Tuition fees will remain the same for each year of your course providing you complete it in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study).

Additional Information

A Masters qualification typically comprises 180 credits, a PGDip 120 credits, a PGCert 60 credits, and an MFA 300 credits. Tuition fees will remain the same for each year of study provided the course is completed in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study).

Part-time students may take a maximum of 90 credits each academic year.

Additional costs

Specialist Costs

All of the books required for the course are available from the library. The University also has PC labs and a laptop loan service. However, many students choose to buy some of the core textbooks for the course and/or a laptop. Students may also need to print their assignments and other documents. Campus printing costs start from 5p per page. Estimated costs are £300 for a laptop up to £100 each year for books and printing.

Postgraduate Loan Scheme

Up to £10,609 available to students who live in England

Find out more

Alumni Loyalty Discount

Rewarding our graduates

Learn more

Want to know more?

How to apply

The quickest and most efficient way to apply for this course is to apply online. This way, you can also track your application at each stage of the process.

Apply online now

Download our course application form. There are instructions on what to do next and who to send the form to in the Word document.

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Programme Review
Our programmes undergo an annual review and major review (normally at 6 year intervals) to ensure an up-to-date curriculum supported by the latest online learning technology. For further information on when we may make changes to our programmes, please see the changes section of our Terms and Conditions.

Important Notice
This online prospectus provides an overview of our programmes of study and the University. We regularly update our online prospectus so that our published course information is accurate. Please check back to the online prospectus before making an application to us to access the most up to date information for your chosen course of study.

Confirmation of Regulator
The Office for Students is the principal regulator for the University. For further information about their role please visit the Office for Students website. You can find out more about our courses including our approach to timetabling, course structures and assessment and feedback on our website.

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