MSc Speech and Language Therapy (Pre-Registration)

If a child can’t form words, how can they communicate? How does a client eat when her ability to swallow was damaged by a stroke? If a teenager suffers a traumatic brain injury, can he learn to speak or read again?

Attend an open day How to apply
Attend a course fair How to apply

Overview

This is an accelerated, extended two-year course that reflects the values of the NHS constitution and is aimed at graduates who wish to prepare for practice as a speech and language therapist.

It runs over two years (45 weeks per year), and we usually focus on teaching you theory across the first year. This helps you to develop your knowledge of speech and language, and how it applies in the practice setting.

To fund your postgraduate pre-registration Speech and Language Therapy degree, you'll be able to access standard student loans in line with undergraduate funding for pre-registration courses. Find out more about funding your MSc Speech and Language Therapy (Pre-registration). 

As a graduate, you’re eligible for professional registration with the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists (RCSLT) and the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).

On our course, you’ll study topics including early language delay, traumatic brain injury, and difficulties swallowing (dysphagia). You’ll also explore areas such as autism and fluency, phonological delay and disorder, and neurological conditions such as Parkinson’s disease.

Practical sessions are an important part of this course and you’ll learn how to use intervention materials, assessments, and specialist computer programmes. We have a team of technicians to help you master this equipment and you’ll use these skills on your clinical placements.

The second year of our course tends to focus on placements and your dissertation, as well as continuing your theoretical education. You’ll typically spend about 580 hours on placements during the two years of this course, working in settings including hospitals, schools and clinics across the North West.

Some of the placements you might experience include a special educational needs (SEN) provision in a secondary school, children with autism in a residential complex, and adults recovering from strokes in hospital.

Past dissertation topics have included research projects investigating midwives’ experiences of multi-disciplinary working with speech and language therapists, investigating staff experiences of managing children’s swallowing difficulties in a school setting and, investigating support workers’ understanding of supporting speech, language and communication.

Features and Benefits

Career Prospects

When you graduate, you’ll have the skills to work in clinical practice as a speech and language therapist with children and adults.

You can apply to the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) for registration to practise as a speech and language therapist. You can also apply for membership of the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists (RCSLT), the professional body for speech and language therapy in the UK.

Roles for registered speech and language therapists include working with patients in NHS hospitals, with children in schools and clinics, and in community rehabilitation.

Learn more about graduate careers

Entry requirements

Applicants must have a minimum 2:1 UK undergraduate honours degree (or international equivalent) and have studied to A-Level standard or above in the last 5 years.

Additional requirements

Overseas applicants will require IELTS with an overall score of 7.5 with no less than 7.0 in any category, or an equivalent accepted English qualification. Accepted English qualifications can be viewed here.

A satisfactory Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) certificate is required for all students. This will be completed through the university prior to enrolment.

PLACEMENTS AT MANCHESTER MET

No matter how high our academic ambitions, our focus is always practical. So we offer more than an exciting student experience. With the skills you'll develop, the knowledge you'll learn and experience you'll gain, you can prepare for a rewarding career after you graduate. 

Find out more about our clinical placements

Course details

Our accelerated course combines theory and practical sessions to prepare you to practise as a speech and language therapist in a modern, challenging environment.

You’ll look at some of the issues you might face in a paediatric setting, such as working with children with developmental language disorder or who are unable to produce speech sounds.

You’ll also explore the adult lifespan, covering topics such as motor speech disorders, and communication and swallowing impairments in a range of conditions such as strokes and, Parkinson’s disease.

The majority of our teaching team are speech and language therapists, and you’ll usually have specialist teaching sessions with a phonetician and psychologist too.

Many members of our team have worked in local education authorities and across the NHS. Their work experience means that they understand health and education across both paediatric and adult settings.

As well as teaching from our academic team, you’ll have guest lectures with people experiencing speech and language difficulties and practitioners. Previous speakers include a speech and language therapist working in adult services, a specialist in fluency who works in the NHS, and a group of patients recovering from strokes.

Outside of studying, you can join our Speech Society, which is mainly run by the speech and language therapy students on our undergraduate degree. They organise a series of talks, workshops and events to help promote speech and language therapy and develop your knowledge outside of the classroom.

You’ll also have the opportunity to apply to work on research projects with our academic team. Students recently helped to collect and input data as part of a speech therapy trial within primary schools, with Dr Julie Lachkovic.

During the first year the following core units are studied. Some of these span both units of study.

  • Academic and Professional Practice in Speech and Language Therapy
  • Clinical Theory 1 (Developmental Speech, Language and Communication Disorders)
  • Clinical Theory 2 (Acquired Speech, Language, Communication and Swallowing Disorders)
  • Clinical Theory 3 (Lifelong and Complex Speech, Language, Communication and Swallowing Disabilities)
  • Linguistics and Language Acquisition
  • Phonetics and Phonology
  • Professional Competency in Speech and Language Therapy
  • Research Methods and Dissertation

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

Academic and Professional Practice in Speech and Language Therapy

Academic and Professional Practice in Speech and Language Therapy (APPSLT) will introduce students to key academic and professional skills, including reflective practice, postgraduate academic skills and elements of professionalism and professional communication skills.   The unit will include a weeks placement in an Early Years Educational setting.

Clinical Theory 1 (Developmental Speech, Language and Communication Disorders)

This unit explores the role of the Speech and Language Therapist in the remediation of developmental Speech Language and Communication difficulties. A clinical placement involving working with children forms part of the required learning experience for this unit. This will enable students to clinically apply the learning they have carried out in the directed and student-centred learning associated with this unit, giving them practical experience of working with a range of paediatric clients.

Clinical Theory 2 (Acquired Speech, Language, Communication and Swallowing Disorders)

This unit focusses on the most common acquired impairments of speech, language, communication and swallowing. Using cases, we will examine the clinical, psychological and biological aspects of a range of acquired conditions. A clinical placement involving working with adults forms part of the required learning experience for this unit. This will enable students to clinically apply the learning they have carried out in the directed and student-centred learning associated with this unit, giving them practical experience of working with a range of adult clients.

Linguistics and Language Acquisition

In this unit students will learn to recognise and analyse the structures and uses of (impaired) language and how language is acquired over the lifespan.

Theoretical content will include:

  • Analysing (developmental/typical/disordered) grammar, semantics and pragmatics, and interpreting these analyses in relation to general linguistic frameworks/theories.
  • Psycholinguistics, including neurolinguistics, and its use in interpreting communicative practices relevant to SLT.
  • Sociolinguistics, including multilingualism and discourse analysis, and its use in interpreting communicative practices relevant to SLT.
  • Skills to prepare and conduct linguistic data collection in a school environment.
Phonetics and Phonology

This unit introduces key theoretical concepts and practical skills in phonetics and phonology for speech and language therapy students, and provides opportunities for students to use their skills, apply their knowledge, and critically evaluate data.

Indicative content will include:

  • Articulatory, acoustic and instrumental analysis of speech sounds;
  • the structure of the segmental and suprasegmental system in English;
  • phonological analysis of disordered and non-disordered speech; 
  • auditory analysis of speech, including clinical data, and its transcription at both phonemic and phonetic levels. 
Professional Competency in Speech and Language Therapy

In this unit, students will apply their theoretical knowledge and develop clinical autonomy in practice placement contexts. They will demonstrate practical application of diagnostic skills and clinical reasoning.

The key elements of this unit build on students theoretical knowledge and how it is practically applied to clinical practice whilst on clinical placement.  This includes: (i)multi-disciplinary working; (ii)critical reflection on clinical practice; (iii) ethical practice in speech-language therapy and (iv) the development of cultural sensitivity and competence.  There will be an emphasis on employability throughout the unit.

Research Methods and Dissertation

Further develop existing knowledge and understanding of the research process by completing a dissertation.

The key theme is the completion of a research-based dissertation. This will include the development of a research question, appropriate design and method (including completing appropriate ethics approval processes), data collection procedures, data analysis and evaluation. This unit runs across Year 1 and Year 2

During the second year of study, students complete units started in the first year. These core units are:

  • Clinical Theory 2 (Acquired Speech, Language, Communication and Swallowing Disorders)
  • Clinical Theory 3 (Lifelong and Complex Speech, Language, Communication and Swallowing Disabilities)
  • Professional Competency in Speech and Language Therapy
  • Research Methods and Dissertation

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

Clinical Theory 3 (lifelong and Complex Speech, Language, Communication and Swallowing Disabilities)

This unit enables students to gain an in depth understanding of conditions that have lifelong impact on communication, and EDS. Communication difficulties that arise alongside psychosocial difficulties and sensory disabilities such as hearing impairment will also be considered. It then explores the integration of perspectives from biological sciences such as audiology, and psychological theory and the application of this information, including its relevance to the practice of speech and language therapy. This unit includes a placement in term 2 of this second year.

Assessment weightings and contact hours

10 credits equates to 100 hours of study, which is a combination of lectures, seminars and practical sessions, and independent study. A Masters qualification typically comprises of 180 credits, a PGDip 120 credits, a PGCert 60 credits and an MFA 300 credits. The exact composition of your study time and assessments for the course will vary according to your option choices and style of learning, but it could be:

Study
Assessment

Additional information about this course

Additional Information About this Course

Health checks - You will be required to complete an Occupational Health Assessment to ensure that your health does not constitute a barrier to the achievement of the programme learning outcomes or eligibility to apply for registration with the professional body. This will require the completion of a health questionnaire before or during the first few weeks of your course, followed by an occupational health screening appointment which will include the consideration of appropriate immunisations. Travel costs to appointments (which will be within the Greater Manchester area) will not be covered by the University. 

Professional Suitability - Students on programmes leading to professional qualifications are required to adhere to professional standards and codes of practice during their studies. Failure to do so may lead to exclusion from the programme on the grounds of professional unsuitability. Students will be briefed about the requirements at the start of their studies. Course specific regulations - Professional, Statutory and Regulatory Bodies require students to achieve results that demonstrate their ability to practise safely. There are therefore some exceptions to the standard University Assessment Regulations for those students, for example limitations on resits and on compensation of failed marks.

Placement options

You’ll typically spend about 580 hours on placements during the two years of this course, working in settings including hospitals, schools and clinics across the North West. (The RCSLT require that you complete at least 525 hours.)

When you’re on a placement, you’ll collect data to complete assignments, such as an essay or case study. We work closely with our placement partners to make sure that they’re aware of the tasks you’ll need to complete.

Your first placement, in the first term, is usually a five-day education placement in an early years setting. In the second term, you’ll begin the first of your clinical practice placements – you’ll typically spend two days per week for ten weeks in a paediatric setting.

During your second year, you’ll usually work with adults at places such as care homes and hospitals (in the neurology unit, for example) or in their homes. This placement lasts for seven weeks, with four days per week in practice.

For your final eleven-week placement in term two, you’ll usually complete three days per week and you can work with adults or children.

Department of Health Professions

Our Department of Health Professions teaches subjects including physiotherapy, speech and language therapy, and nutritional sciences.

The department is committed to ensuring its courses stay relevant and up-to-date with current professional practice, by maintaining links with colleagues in clinical practice and research.

More about the department

Taught by experts

Your studies are supported by a team of committed and enthusiastic teachers and researchers, experts in their chosen field. We also work with external professionals, many of whom are Manchester Met alumni, to enhance your learning and appreciation of the wider subject.

Meet our expert staff

Fees

UK and EU students

UK and EU students: Full-time fee: £9,250 per year. Tuition fees will remain the same for each year of your course providing you complete it in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study).

Non-EU and Channel Island students

Non-EU international and Channel Island students: Full-time fee: £18,000 per year. Tuition fees will remain the same for each year of your course providing you complete it in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study).

Additional Information

A Masters qualification typically comprises 180 credits, a PGDip 120 credits, a PGCert 60 credits, and an MFA 300 credits. Tuition fees will remain the same for each year of study provided the course is completed in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study).

Part-time students may take a maximum of 90 credits each academic year.

Additional costs

Specialist Costs

All of the books required for the course are available from the library. The University also has PC labs and a laptop loan service. However, many students choose to buy some of the core textbooks for the course and/or a laptop. Students may also need to print their assignments and other documents. Campus printing costs start from 5p per page. Estimated costs are £300 for a laptop up to £100 each year for books and printing. Uniforms: Full uniform is provided free of charge when the course commences. If students wish to replace any item of uniform or secure additional items of uniform throughout the programme (e.g. because it has been damaged or no longer fits) then they must order and pay for this directly with the supplier. There are certain exceptions to this, for example if the student becomes pregnant. These are detailed in the faculty uniform policy. Students can choose to purchase non-standard items such as fleeces directly from the supplier.

Placement Costs

2 to 12 a day whilst on placement (costs will vary considerably)

You will need to budget for travel costs to your placement which could be up to 100 kilometres from the University. Travelling time one-way should not exceed 2.5 hours, and it is rare for it to be up to the maximum limit. Travel costs to placement will vary considerably depending on where you live, the location of your placement and how you choose to travel. Information on public transport costs within Greater Manchester can be found at www.tfgm.com. All NHS Trusts charge for car parking.

Professional Costs

Compulsory Estimate: DBS £0 to 135 depending on your status. Please go to our DBS webpage for more details: http://www.mmu.ac.uk/dbs/HCPC registration fees are currently £90 for two years

DBS Checks: Before starting on your course, you must undergo a satisfactory Disclosure and Barring Service check (Enhanced Disclosure). At the time of going to press, you do not have to pay for your first DBS check. If you cannot attend a DBS session at the University before the start of the course, you can use the UK Post Office Document Certification Service, which costs approximately £10. If you are not a UK citizen, or if you have lived in one country outside the UK for six or more months in the last five years, you must, where this is possible, obtain a police clearance certificate from the country in which you resided, in addition to the Disclosure and Barring Service check. You must supply a certified translation if the certificate does not automatically include this. Costs vary and can include fingerprint and translation fees where required. Returning students, who have already had a DBS certificate from Manchester Met and who need a second DBS certificate, for example, due to a suspension of study, are required to pay the DBS fee. Please go to our DBS webpage for more details and for current DBS fees: http://www.mmu.ac.uk/dbs/

Postgraduate Loan Scheme

Loans of up to £10,280 for many Postgraduate Courses

Find out more

Alumni Loyalty Discount

Rewarding our graduates

Learn more

Want to know more?

How to apply

The quickest and most efficient way to apply for this course is to apply online. This way, you can also track your application at each stage of the process.

Apply online now

The quickest and most efficient way to apply for this course is to apply online. This way, you can also track your application at each stage of the process.

Download Application form

Guide to completing your Personal Statement

Application Deadline: Wednesday 1 May 2019

Your career prospects after the course:

The choice of possible career routes is diverse and after graduation there are opportunities for work within the National Health Service, in the private sector, or overseas.

There are also a range of opportunities for postgraduate study and research.

Some of our degree programmes provide a range of practitioner options, and the nature of the units available can contribute to current personal and professional development.

If you are unable to apply online, you can apply for postgraduate taught courses by completing the postgraduate application form. There are exceptions for some professional courses – the course information on our on-line prospectus will give you more information in these cases.

Please note: to apply for this course, you only need to provide one reference.

You can review our current Terms and Conditions before you make your application. If you are successful with your application, we will send you up to date information alongside your offer letter.

MANCHESTER IS YOUR CITY. BE PART OF IT.

Programme Review
Our programmes undergo an annual review and major review (normally at 6 year intervals) to ensure an up-to-date curriculum supported by the latest online learning technology. For further information on when we may make changes to our programmes, please see the changes section of our Terms and Conditions.

Important Notice
This online prospectus provides an overview of our programmes of study and the University. We regularly update our online prospectus so that our published course information is accurate. Please check back to the online prospectus before making an application to us to access the most up to date information for your chosen course of study.

Confirmation of Regulator
The Manchester Metropolitan University is regulated by the Office for Students (OfS). The OfS is the independent regulator of higher education in England. More information on the role of the OfS and its regulatory framework can be found at officeforstudents.org.uk.

All higher education providers registered with the OfS must have a student protection plan in place. The student protection plan sets out what students can expect to happen should a course, campus, or institution close. Access our current Student Protection Plan.

Top