BA (Hons) Acting

Attend an open day How to apply
Attend an open day How to apply

Overview

The BA (Hons) Acting programme provides the necessary experience and skills to train as a professional actor working on stage and screen.

Based in the Manchester School of Theatre, at the University's hub for theatre, culture and media, the Acting course enjoys very strong links with many of the region's key employers including BBC, Granada, Royal Exchange Theatre, Contact Theatre, HOME and The Lowry. This course is taught by tutors with a wealth of experience as practitioners, researchers and educators.

Former students have gone on to highly successful careers in film, television and theatre and graduates include Sir Anthony Sher, Julie Walters CBE, David Threlfall, John Bradley, Richard Griffiths, Bernard Hill, Steve Coogan, John Thomson, Noreen Kershaw, Amanda Burton and Adam Kotz.

With regular input from visiting professional practitioners, the course aims to nurture instinctive ability in an environment that allows for the development of new skills while simultaneously enabling you to recognise particular strengths and abilities.

Workshops, classes, seminars and public performances are designed to synthesise component skills that include voice, movement, acting, textual analysis and research.

Find out more about the Manchester School of Theatre and the Acting course at www.theatre.mmu.ac.uk including details of the audition process and profiles of current students and graduates.

Features and Benefits

Career Prospects

Graduates of the School pursue careers as professional actors working in theatre, film, TV and radio. Many former students also establish careers as professional directors, writers, filmmakers, agents and teachers.

Learn more about graduate careers

Entry requirements

These typical entry requirements apply to the 2018 academic year of entry and may be subject to change for the 2019 academic year. Please check back for further details.

UCAS tariff points/grades required

112

112 at A2 or equivalent (which can include Foundation Diploma in Art & Design). A Level General Studies is not accepted.

Specific GCSE requirements

GCSE English Language at grade C or grade 4. Equivalent qualifications (eg. Functional Skills) may be considered

Non Tariffed Qualifications

Pass Access to HE Diploma in a relevant subject with a minimum 112 UCAS Tariff Points

International Baccalaureate points

26

IELTS score required for international students

6.0 with no element below 5.5

There’s further information for international students on our international website if you’re applying with non-UK qualifications.

Additional Requirements

Audition required. The course is highly competitive and you may be called back to a second or even third audition. There is a charge for the first audition. Further details.

Further information

Please note the University does not accept deferred applications or advanced entry applications for this course

Course details

The course aims to nurture instinctive ability in an environment that allows for the development of new skills whilst simultaneously enabling you to recognise particular strengths and abilities. You will have the opportunity to learn from a wide range of practitioners and inspiring teachers and the School benefits from strong links with many of the region’s key theatres.

Workshops, classes, seminars and public performances are designed to synthesise component skills that include voice, movement, acting, textual analysis and research. The course aims to nurture instinctive ability in an environment that allows for the development of new skills whilst simultaneously enabling you to recognise particular strengths and abilities.

In Year 1 your study units will include movement and voice, ensemble work, acting technique and scene study.

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

Contextualising Practice 1

30 credit unit. You are allocated to one of five pathways addressing programme-based clusters of cognate practice areas. Lectures, seminars, guest speakers, visits will address the historical, critical and cultural contexts of art and design practice.

The Actors Craft 1: Self and Ensemble

The work of this unit provides the foundations on which the course is established and involves an exploration of notions of self as a basis for practical exploration and creative investigation.

The Actors Craft 2: Creating A Role

This unit builds on the work of the first term by developing the areas of voice, movement and acting in such a way as to nurture an integrated and embodied approach to the practical realization of a given scene.

The Actors Craft 3: Playing The Scene

This unit provides a creative and supportive environment in which you can experiment with and test out an integrated approach to rehearsal and performance practice within the context of a text based scene study project.

Year 2 will include experimental and devised theatre, Shakespeare, acting for camera, stage combat and singing.

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

The Contemporary Actor

Building on the work of Year 1, this unit explores the development of an actor's craft in the context of more contemporary and experimental forms in live and recorded performance contexts.  Through the practical and embodied investigation of live theatre texts and recorded TV/Film based scripts, this unit introduces students to the interpretative demands of a range of different kinds of contemporary and experimental modes of performance. The development of a secure rehearsal process at Year 1 moves towards an increasing focus on the rehearsal and performance contexts and the demands of the audience/spectator. All students will undertake a live scene-study project and the rehearsal and recording of a scene for TV along with a devising project.

Playing Shakespeare

This unit develops the acting work of previous terms and introduces the linguistic, dramatic, aesthetic and interpretative demands of Shakespeare's theatre. The emphasis is on the need to be able to identify and reveal the psychological and spiritual dynamics of character, relationship and dramatic situation through the primacy of heightened language and extreme character objectives. The work of this unit is closely allied to voice and movement sessions and classes and rehearsals may well involve combined input from members of staff working in each discipline.

Black Box Workshop

This unit involves the rehearsal and presentation of a classical or contemporary theatre text. The aims are to reinforce established working methods and respond to individual and/or collective developmental needs.  Sensitive to the needs of both the individual actor and those of the group, this unit affords an opportunity for students to rehearse and perform a complete play. Texts will be chosen from the classical or contemporary repertoires and may be realist and/or experimental /avant-garde. 

Contextualising Practice 2

Delivery of critical, historical and professional issues to enhance your development within practice-based clusters. Delivery to clusters of cognate practice areas. Content consists of selected thematic options in critical and historical areas plus cluster-wide professional and employability issues, facilitating and enhancing the development of both studio-based work and identity as a practitioner.

Year 3 is performance-based and you will work with both staff and guest directors from across Europe in preparation for a series of fully realised public performances in the School’s own Capitol Theatre. Students are also trained to act for radio and take part in the annual Showcase event and festivals at London’s Globe Theatre and Royal Shakespeare Company.

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

Theatre Production 1

This unit introduces students to the demands of public performance and to the need to develop their work in a context that requires high levels of discipline, interpretative skill and professionalism.  Plays are selected and students cast in the autumn season of plays at the end of the term. Students are required to undertake research and analysis as part of the preparation for rehearsals. Performance materials are selected from a wide range of genres and theatrical traditions and the choice of texts is informed by the developmental needs and strengths of the cohort as a whole. Rehearsals operate in exactly the same manner as they would in the profession and each play rehearses on a full-time basis for between 4 and 5 weeks. Students work alongside a team that includes a production manager, wardrobe supervisor, stage manager, professional designers and other technical staff. Each production is fully realised and staged and is performed in the Capitol Theatre before a paying audience and invited guests from the profession.

Theatre Production 2

This unit affords students a further opportunity to encounter the demands of public performance and to further develop their work in a context that requires high levels of discipline, interpretative skill and professionalism.  Plays are selected and students are cast in the spring season of plays at the end of the previous term. Students are required to undertake research and analysis as part of the preparation for rehearsals. Performance materials are selected from a wide range of genres and theatrical traditions and the choice of texts is informed by the developmental needs/strengths of the cohort as a whole.  Rehearsals operate in exactly the same manner as they would in the profession and each play rehearses on a full-time basis for between 4 and 5 weeks. Students work alongside a team that includes a production manager, wardrobe supervisor, stage manager, professional designers and other technical staff. Each production is fully realised and is performed in the Capitol Theatre before a paying audience and invited guests from the profession. This is the companion unit to Theatre Production One.

Contextualising Practice 3
Programme of research and critical analysis of cultural and professional issues related to a student's individual practice interests.
Theatre Production 3

This unit affords you a final opportunity to encounter the demands of public performance and to further develop your work in a context that requires high levels of technical discipline, interpretative skill and professionalism. Plays are selected and students cast in the summer season of plays at the end of the previous term. You are required to undertake research and analysis as part of the preparation for rehearsals. Performance materials are selected from a wide range of genres and theatrical traditions and the choice of texts is informed by the developmental needs/strengths of the cohort as a whole and build on the work and discoveries made during the course of Theatre Production One. Rehearsals operate in exactly the same manner as they would in the profession and each play rehearses on a full-time basis for 4 weeks. Students work alongside a team that includes a production manager, wardrobe supervisor, stage manager, professional designers and other technical staff. Each production is fully realised and staged and is performed in the Capitol Theatre before a paying audience and invited guests from the profession. This is the companion unit to Theatre Productions One and Two.

Assessment weightings and contact hours

Study
Assessment

Manchester School of Theatre

More about the department

Taught by experts

Your studies are supported by a team of committed and enthusiastic teachers and researchers, experts in their chosen field. We also work with external professionals, many of whom are Manchester Met alumni, to enhance your learning and appreciation of the wider subject.

Meet our expert staff

Fees

Tuition fees for the 2019/20 academic year are still being finalised for all courses. Please see our general guide to our standard undergraduate tuition fees.

Part-time students may take a maximum of 90 credits each academic year.

Additional costs

Specialist Costs

All of the books required for the course are available from the library. The University also has PC labs and a laptop loan service. However, many students choose to buy some of the core textbooks for the course and/or a laptop. Students may also need to print their assignments and other documents. Campus printing costs start from 5p per page. Estimated costs are £300 for a laptop up to £100 each year for books and printing. Total optional cost: £600

Other Costs

£385

Students will need rehearsal clothing in year one (practice skirts, shoes, trousers for men and white shirts): £75 In Year 3, students will need to purchase a sword estimated at £60 and professional photographs estimated at £250

Funding

For further information on financing your studies or information about whether you may qualify for one of our bursaries and scholarships, follow the links below:

Bursaries and scholarships

Money Matters

Want to know more?

How to apply

You can apply for this course through UCAS.

Apply now

UCAS code(s)

W411

Remember to use the correct institution code for Manchester Metropolitan University on your application: our institution code is M40

You can review our current Terms and Conditions before you make your application. If you are successful with your application, we will send you up to date information alongside your offer letter.

MANCHESTER IS YOUR CITY. BE PART OF IT.

Programme Review
Our programmes undergo an annual review and major review (normally at 6 year intervals) to ensure an up-to-date curriculum supported by the latest online learning technology. For further information on when we may make changes to our programmes, please see the changes section of our Terms and Conditions.

Important Notice
This online prospectus provides an overview of our programmes of study and the University. We regularly update our online prospectus so that our published course information is accurate. Please check back to the online prospectus before making an application to us to access the most up to date information for your chosen course of study.

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The Office for Students is the principal regulator for the University. For further information about their role please visit the Office for Students website. You can find out more about our courses including our approach to timetabling, course structures and assessment and feedback on our website.

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