BA (Hons) English and Multimedia Journalism

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Attend an open day How to apply

Overview

English and journalism have long been a strong partnership. Today, with the multimedia element, our joint honours puts a modern spin on the most enduring of partnerships.

The connection between English and journalism is as old as the oldest news publications. This exciting degree offers the chance to bring the former together with an up-to-the-minute, multimedia version of the latter, reflecting the demands of the modern media environment. 

Today’s journalists are expected to operate across broadcast, print and online networks. With a broad range of units, we’ll give you all the skills you need to compete in this fast-moving world. You’ll learn from accomplished reporters and editors, drawing on extensive newsroom experience to give you industry-relevant understanding and insights. 

You’ll also build a set of complementary skills through our range of English units, including critical and cultural theories and textual analysis. Then when you get to your final year, you’ll have the chance to put those skills into practice – by tackling a substantial piece of work, whether a portfolio of journalism or an extended piece of critical writing. 

Along the way, you will have opportunities to study abroad and, if you wish, to do your third year as a placement - in Britain or abroad. You will be based in a lively department that is staffed by internationally renowned writers and critics, and there's a strong research culture, creating a learning environment that is both supportive and intellectually challenging.

Manchester has one of the biggest digital and creative sectors in the UK. With MediaCityUK, home to the BBC and ITV, it’s an ideal place for an ambitious journalist to build a network, gain experience and boost your career prospects.

Features and Benefits

Career Prospects

Previous graduates from our courses in the areas of English and journalism have entered a wide range of employment, especially media work and teaching, where their transferable skills are particularly relevant.

Recent English graduates have become school and college teachers, and gained employment in fields as diverse as banking and finance, manufacturing and retail.

There is also the opportunity to engage in further study and professional training, for example some of our graduates go on to study creative writing at postgraduate level in our Manchester Writing School under the creative direction of Poet Laureate Professor Carol Ann Duffy DBE.

However the opportunities for further study are diverse and some students have undertaken further professional training to work in law, public administration, management, and librarianship.

For our journalism graduates, the rapidly changing digital media and creative industries offer career opportunities in an extremely wide range of sectors including print journalism, digital publishing and editing, broadcasting, researching, media development, freelance writing, specialist journalism, working for news agencies, public relations departments and public sector press departments.

Learn more about graduate careers

Entry requirements

These typical entry requirements apply to the 2019 academic year of entry and may be subject to change for the 2020 academic year. Please check back for further details.

UCAS tariff points/grades required

104-112

104-112 UCAS Tariff points from three A2s or acceptable alternatives.

An English subject at GCE A Level is preferred e.g. English Language, English Literature, English Language/Literature.  Subjects such as Creative Writing, Drama, Theatre Studies, Religious Education, History, Media Studies will also be considered

Performing Arts, Production Arts or Creative Media Production are preferred from applicants studying BTEC qualifications

Specific GCSE requirements

GCSE English Language and Mathematics at grade C or grade 4. Equivalent qualifications (eg. Functional Skills) may be considered

Non Tariffed Qualifications

106-112 UCAS Tariff Points from Access to HE Diploma in a relevant subject with at least 45 credits at Level 3 -  units taken must include some element of literary or cultural study.

International Baccalaureate points

26

IELTS score required for international students

6 with no element below 5.5

There’s further information for international students on our international website if you’re applying with non-UK qualifications.

Course details

Teaching on the Multimedia Journalism units is delivered by experienced journalists with many years of practical experience and excellent links to major media players including newspapers, TV companies, radio stations and digital publishers in Manchester and beyond. This ensures that what is learned on the course is informed by the very latest trends and developments in the media. Students will also hear about the experiences and insights of working journalists, digital publishers and broadcasters who will give regular talks and run workshops.

The English units take a comparative and contemporary approach to the study of literature and focus on the major genres of drama, prose, fiction and poetry. In historical terms our curriculum covers the seventeenth century to the present, with strong emphasis on the literature of the last two centuries. You will also have the opportunity to take modules in creative writing, film, television, and cultural studies. We also offer modules covering literature from the United States, Africa, the Indian subcontinent and the Caribbean. You will learn strategies for reading and interpreting, not only books, but other forms of text and the world around you. We pride ourselves on our excellent teaching, highly positive student feedback and strong research culture.

In Year 1 there is a compulsory syllabus, with course units in narrative, critical dialogues, digital publishing and journalism skills. These units will introduce you to the reading skills and ideas needed for the study of English and Multimedia Journalism.

 

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

Journalism Skills

Covers conceptual and skills development relevant to contemporary newspaper and online reporting, law and ethics.

Digital Publishing

An introduction to writing online, blogging and publishing digitally.

Metropolis 2: Writing Worlds

An introduction to skills of research, writing and project development. You will develop your own independent project and put into practice the analytical skills developed on Metropolis 1: Reading Manchester.

Metropolis 1: Reading Manchester (15 credits)

This unit introduces key skills for University study. You will learn skills of close reading and textual analysis, practised on a range of cultural forms and focussed on representations of Manchester as a diverse, international city.

Approaches to Narrative 2

An introduction to the analysis of narrative forms and genres, focussing primarily on 20th and 21st Century texts.

Approaches to Narrative 1

An introduction to the analysis of narrative forms and genres, focussing primarily on pre-20th Century texts.

In Year 2 you will study two core units which deal with major aspects of multimedia journalism including editing and production and media law. In addition you will select from a choice of core option units on topics such as creative writing and critical theory.

Please note, these option units are indicative of what options may be on offer in Year 2 of this programme but may be subject to change.

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

Media Law and Regulation

This unit teaches students about the British Legal System and the industry's regulatory framework. It introduces essential legislation which affects the work of journalists.

Editing & Production

Newspaper and online news site planning and effective page design. Convergence awareness, re-versioning stories and editing for print and digital platforms.

Option Units

Nineteenth-Century Writing to Modernism
This unit will develop your knowledge and understanding of British poetry, fiction, drama, visual art and travel literature published between 1800 and 1939.
EdLab (15 credit unit)

EdLab units enable you to gain credit for project-based learning conducted in partnership with external practitioners, charities and social enterprises, educational providers and other workplaces. Your project may be the development of products or resources, interventions or educational opportunities.

Creative Writing Workshop

This unit covers topics such as creative writing: poetry, prose, script, considering processes of writing and engaging with writing techniques. Over the course of two terms you will elect to write in two of the following three genres: Prose, Poetry, Script. Accordingly, the unit's learning outcomes are replicated across two terms as in each term a different genre will be covered, providing the same generic skills but honed to the specific demands of the genre. You will, then, study the formal aspects of creative writing, including linkage between form and content, genre and structure.

Post-war to the Present

This unit will introduce you to a range of contemporary British fiction and drama written in the period between the end of WW2 and up to the present day.

Critical and Cultural Theory I

This unit introduces theoretical arguments about literature as a cultural practice, raising questions about its social significance and how we make value judgements about texts.  The unit will draw upon and link three fields of critical practice.  By analysing texts using Critical Theory, Postcolonial Theory and Disability Studies you will reflect upon the relationship between theoretical models and literary and cinematic representations.

This course offers a placement year option which can be taken up in Year 3. Where a placement is not undertaken you will study the following final year units.

Please note, these option units are indicative of what options may be on offer in Year 3 of this programme but may be subject to change.

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

Arts & Humanities Project

You will work with a supervisor to define an independent project on an appropriate topic of your choosing. You may focus on an academic subject or work with an external partner. Preliminary research will generate a detailed proposal, which will form the basis of a guided independent research-based project to produce an extended piece of work that presents a thesis. Your final submission will be an individual project that builds upon the skills you have developed on your course.

Option Units

Feature Writing

This unit will develop further the practical skills involved in the craft of feature writing in print and online. Content will include an exploration of the art of feature writing, generating ideas and research, using descriptive text and the use of language, specialist features, writing to entertain, genre and theme, markets for features, profiles and interviews, the world of the freelance and pitching ideas.

Representing Trauma
This unit is concerned with critical and creative conceptions, constructions and depictions of forms of violence and trauma, and introduces you to representations and theories of trauma drawn from multiple locations (temporal and geographic).
American Literature & Culture 1945 to the Present
The unit surveys American literature and culture (including black and African American music) from 1945 to the present day. It introduces you to the range and diversity of recent US literature, beginning in the post-World War II period and continuing through to the present day. Alongside the study of literature, students explore the wider cultural scene in the US, in particular, the political and social significance of black and African American music.
Cultures of Life and Death: Debates In Contemporary Literature, Film and Theory

This unit investigates the question of the human in contemporary cultural debate. In this exchange - between theory and cultural texts - topics such as neoliberalism, bare life and biopolitics, contagion and immunity, bodily commodification, surveillance culture, artificial intelligence and neurochemical selfhood will be explored via a discussion of a range of key theoretical, literary and cinematic texts. 

Modern Gothic
This unit introduces and defines the field of Gothic studies via film, TV and literature as the locus of textual and contextual issues. It explores the mode's responses to historical and social change via psychoanalytical and socio-cultural theory. The unit develops student skills in both close textual reading and psychological and ideological analysis of the mode. It introduces you to the critical and historical field of Gothic studies.
Reading and Writing Children's Literature
This unit provides an analytical study of a range of classic and modern texts written for children. It also uses these texts as models for the production of new texts. The unit also covers appropriate techniques for writing for children. It provides you with the skills to analyse a range of children's literature, and to use the resulting knowledge to produce original texts suitable for teenagers and children. 
EdLab (15 credit unit)

EdLab units enable you to gain credit for project-based learning conducted in partnership with external practitioners, charities and social enterprises, educational providers and other workplaces. Your project may be the development of products or resources, interventions or educational opportunities.

This must be taken with the co-requisite unit ‘Reading Children's Literature' (15 credit unit) OR Reading Games (15 credit unit).

Reading and Writing Poetry
This unit explores relations between reading and writing poetry. It focuses on reading and analysing a representative range of work by contemporary poets, and introduces you to relevant critical work. It equips you with critical, analytical and writing skills to read and write poetry effectively.
Writing and Place

This unit will critically analyse the representation of place in key contemporary texts. These texts, drawn from a range of genres, will be evaluated within the frameworks (including literary geography and ecocriticism) provided by contemporary theoretical debates. The unit will also situate creative and conceptual writing about place within the context of 'real world debates': topics to be covered will include environmental crisis, regeneration and the post-industrial city, and digital technologies and spatial literacy.

Reading and Writing Games

This unit provides an analytical study of a range of twenty and twenty-first century games both analogue and digital. You will be introduced to the critical and historical field of game studies, and given guidance on the appropriate techniques for writing for gaming and the experience of working with pre-determined project briefs.

Advanced Audio and Video

This unit will build on students' understanding of advanced audio and video skills and methods employed by journalists. It will explore the theory behind audio and video journalism in relation to contemporary debates. Building on operational techniques, including editing, research, interviewing, scripting and presentation students will critique content and consider ethical issues.

Writing in Genres

The course will begin with an overview of the genres under consideration; thereafter students will have the opportunity to try their skills in three different genres in workshops dedicated to each specialism. The genres on offer may vary each year depending on staff, but might include three from e.g. historical fiction, crime fiction, fantasy writing and science fiction. In the first term, students will submit a portfolio of short pieces selected from their creative work in these genres. In the second term, students will concentrate on an extended piece of creative writing in their genre of choice. Both the portfolio and the extended piece will be accompanied by a critical reflection on the creative process.

Writing Series Drama

The unit concentrates on the composition of series, serials and continuing drama as opposed to the single play, in the context of critical awareness of contemporary dramatic writing. It reinforces and develops students' pitching, storylining and scriptwriting skills. Students will study the historical development of episodic drama and professional writers' responses to new technologies, including webcasting; key texts will illustrate a range of formats such as cop shows, comedy series, sci-fi, soaps, medical/hospital drama and explore the relationships between generic and 'authored' series. Students will devise the premise for a long-running drama to be pitched in class, and then work in teams to plot storylines over a number of episodes. In the light of feedback from tutor and peers, each student will then write her or his own individual version of the narrative framework for the group-devised story. Each writer will then script fifteen minutes of playing time of the devised storylines

Language, Image, Media

This coursework-based unit promotes the development of an understanding of how linguistic and non-linguistic communication systems operate within mass media. It examines intercultural issues in specific settings such as politics, the corporate environment and the media. It equips students with the tools for carrying out empirical research, presenting findings and critically evaluating media discourse and cultural artefacts.

Reading Children's Literature

This unit provides an analytical study of a range of classic and modern texts written for children. It also uses these texts as models for the production of new texts. The unit also covers appropriate techniques for writing for children. It provides you with the skills to analyse a range of children's literature, and to use the resulting knowledge to produce original texts suitable for teenagers and children. 

This unit may also be taken as a 15+15-credit combination with EdLab'.

Law and Ethics for Multimedia Journalism

Building on knowledge already acquired about key pieces of legislation affecting journalists, this unit will explore their impact through scenarios and practical exercises, examining the impact of the law across a range of platforms. The unit will also explore the legal, practical and ethical problems posed for journalists by social media in newsgathering and publishing. The unit will explore in depth a range of legal and ethical issues including protection of privacy and freedom of information, protection of confidential sources and reporting race and racist organisations.

Sports Journalism

Content will provide students with a basic understanding of the world of sports journalism; insight into the often complex relationship between sports organisations/clubs and the media; an understanding of how sports news can also cross into the wider news agenda. Students will write match reports, news and feature items for various outlets, and appraise and analyse the differences in reporting of local, national and global events.

If you have completed a placement in Year 3 you will study the following final year units in Year 4.

Please note, these option units are indicative of what options may be on offer in Year 4 of this programme but may be subject to change.

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

Arts & Humanities Project

You will work with a supervisor to define an independent project on an appropriate topic of your choosing. You may focus on an academic subject or work with an external partner. Preliminary research will generate a detailed proposal, which will form the basis of a guided independent research-based project to produce an extended piece of work that presents a thesis. Your final submission will be an individual project that builds upon the skills developed on your course.

Option Units

American Literature & Culture 1945 to the Present

The unit surveys American literature and culture (including black and African American music) from 1945 to the present day. It introduces you to the range and diversity of recent US literature, beginning in the post-World War II period and continuing through to the present day. Alongside the study of literature, students explore the wider cultural scene in the US, in particular, the political and social significance of black and African American music.

Feature Writing

This unit will develop further the practical skills involved in the craft of feature writing in print and online. Content will include an exploration of the art of feature writing, generating ideas and research, using descriptive text and the use of language, specialist features, writing to entertain, genre and theme, markets for features, profiles and interviews, the world of the freelance and pitching ideas.

Advanced Audio and Video

This unit will build on students' understanding of advanced audio and video skills and methods employed by journalists. It will explore the theory behind audio and video journalism in relation to contemporary debates. Building on operational techniques, including editing, research, interviewing, scripting and presentation students will critique content and consider ethical issues.

Language, Image, Media

This coursework-based unit promotes the development of an understanding of how linguistic and non-linguistic communication systems operate within mass media. It examines intercultural issues in specific settings such as politics, the corporate environment and the media. It equips students with the tools for carrying out empirical research, presenting findings and critically evaluating media discourse and cultural artefacts.

Sports Journalism

Content will provide students with a basic understanding of the world of sports journalism; insight into the often complex relationship between sports organisations/clubs and the media; an understanding of how sports news can also cross into the wider news agenda. Students will write match reports, news and feature items for various outlets, and appraise and analyse the differences in reporting of local, national and global events.

Law and Ethics for Multimedia Journalism

Building on knowledge already acquired about key pieces of legislation affecting journalists, this unit will explore their impact through scenarios and practical exercises, examining the impact of the law across a range of platforms. The unit will also explore the legal, practical and ethical problems posed for journalists by social media in newsgathering and publishing. The unit will explore in depth a range of legal and ethical issues including protection of privacy and freedom of information, protection of confidential sources and reporting race and racist organisations.

Cultures of Life and Death: Debates In Contemporary Literature, Film and Theory

This unit investigates the question of the human in contemporary cultural debate. In this exchange - between theory and cultural texts - topics such as neoliberalism, bare life and biopolitics, contagion and immunity, bodily commodification, surveillance culture, artificial intelligence and neurochemical selfhood will be explored via a discussion of a range of key theoretical, literary and cinematic texts. 

Modern Gothic

This unit introduces and defines the field of Gothic studies via film, TV and literature as the locus of textual and contextual issues. It explores the mode's responses to historical and social change via psychoanalytical and socio-cultural theory. The unit develops student skills in both close textual reading and psychological and ideological analysis of the mode. It introduces you to the critical and historical field of Gothic studies.

Reading and Writing Children's Literature

This unit provides an analytical study of a range of classic and modern texts written for children. It also uses these texts as models for the production of new texts. The unit also covers appropriate techniques for writing for children. It provides you with the skills to analyse a range of children's literature, and to use the resulting knowledge to produce original texts suitable for teenagers and children. 

Reading and Writing Poetry

This unit explores relations between reading and writing poetry. It focuses on reading and analysing a representative range of work by contemporary poets, and introduces you to relevant critical work. It equips you with critical, analytical and writing skills to read and write poetry effectively.

Representing Trauma

This unit is concerned with critical and creative conceptions, constructions and depictions of forms of violence and trauma, and introduces you to representations and theories of trauma drawn from multiple locations (temporal and geographic).

Writing Series Drama

The unit concentrates on the composition of series, serials and continuing drama as opposed to the single play, in the context of critical awareness of contemporary dramatic writing. It reinforces and develops students' pitching, storylining and scriptwriting skills. Students will study the historical development of episodic drama and professional writers' responses to new technologies, including webcasting; key texts will illustrate a range of formats such as cop shows, comedy series, sci-fi, soaps, medical/hospital drama and explore the relationships between generic and 'authored' series. Students will devise the premise for a long-running drama to be pitched in class, and then work in teams to plot storylines over a number of episodes. In the light of feedback from tutor and peers, each student will then write her or his own individual version of the narrative framework for the group-devised story. Each writer will then script fifteen minutes of playing time of the devised storylines.

Writing in Genres

The course will begin with an overview of the genres under consideration; thereafter students will have the opportunity to try their skills in three different genres in workshops dedicated to each specialism. The genres on offer may vary each year depending on staff, but might include three from e.g. historical fiction, crime fiction, fantasy writing and science fiction. In the first term, students will submit a portfolio of short pieces selected from their creative work in these genres. In the second term, students will concentrate on an extended piece of creative writing in their genre of choice. Both the portfolio and the extended piece will be accompanied by a critical reflection on the creative process.

Writing and Place

This unit will critically analyse the representation of place in key contemporary texts. These texts, drawn from a range of genres, will be evaluated within the frameworks (including literary geography and ecocriticism) provided by contemporary theoretical debates. The unit will also situate creative and conceptual writing about place within the context of 'real world debates': topics to be covered will include environmental crisis, regeneration and the post-industrial city, and digital technologies and spatial literacy.

Reading Children's Literature

This unit provides an analytical study of a range of classic and modern texts written for children. It also uses these texts as models for the production of new texts. The unit also covers appropriate techniques for writing for children. It provides you with the skills to analyse a range of children's literature, and to use the resulting knowledge to produce original texts suitable for teenagers and children. 

This unit may also be taken as a 15+15-credit combination with EdLab.

EdLab (15 credit unit)

EdLab units enable you to gain credit for project-based learning conducted in partnership with external practitioners, charities and social enterprises, educational providers and other workplaces. Your project may be the development of products or resources, interventions or educational opportunities.

This must be taken with the co-requisite unit ‘Reading Children's Literature' (15 credit unit) OR Reading Games (15 credit unit).

Reading and Writing Games

This unit provides an analytical study of a range of twenty and twenty-first century games both analogue and digital. You will be introduced to the critical and historical field of game studies, and given guidance on the appropriate techniques for writing for gaming and the experience of working with pre-determined project briefs.

Assessment weightings and contact hours

10 credits equates to 100 hours of study, which is a combination of lectures, seminars and practical sessions, and independent study. A 3 year degree qualification typically comprises of 360 credits (120 credits per year). The exact composition of your study time and assessments for the course will vary according to your option choices and style of learning, but it could be:

Study
Assessment

Department of English

Our Department of English is a large, vibrant community of around fifty internationally renowned writers and critics, and is home to the Manchester Writing School and Centre for Gothic Studies.

As well as a solid grounding in the traditional core of the subject, the department offers a modern and innovative approach to the study of English, with all strands of its degree programmes offering the opportunity to study abroad for a term.

More about the department

Taught by experts

Your studies are supported by a team of committed and enthusiastic teachers and researchers, experts in their chosen field. We also work with external professionals, many of whom are Manchester Met alumni, to enhance your learning and appreciation of the wider subject.

Meet our expert staff

Fees

UK, EU and Channel Island students

UK, EU and Channel Island students: Full-time fee: £9,250 per year. This tuition fee is agreed subject to UK government policy and parliamentary regulation and may increase each academic year in line with inflation or UK government policy for both new and continuing students.

UK, EU and Channel Island students: Part-time fee: £2312.50 per 30 credits studied per year. This tuition fee is agreed subject to UK government policy and parliamentary regulation and may increase each academic year in line with inflation or UK government policy for both new and continuing students.

Non-EU international students

Non-EU international students: Full-time fee: £15,000 per year. Tuition fees will remain the same for each year of your course providing you complete it in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study).

Non-EU international students: Part-time fee: £3750 per 30 credits studied per year. Tuition fees will remain the same for each year of your course providing you complete it in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study).

Additional Information

A degree typically comprises 360 credits, a DipHE 240 credits, a CertHE 120 credits, and an integrated Masters 480 credits. The tuition fee for the placement year for those courses that offer this option is £1,850, subject to inflationary increases based on government policy and providing you progress through the course in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study). The tuition fee for the study year abroad for those courses that offer this option is £1,385, subject to inflationary increases based on government policy and providing you progress through the course in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study).

Part-time students may take a maximum of 90 credits each academic year.

Additional costs

Specialist Costs

£300

English & Multimedia Journalism is a reading subject and students must have access to a copy of all set texts. Primary texts are held in the University library but students often prefer to possess their own copy. Prices vary but many are cheaply available and set texts are often available online for no cost. Students often buy texts second hand, and there is a book exchange in the Atrium of the Manton building. Students may also need to print their assignments and other documents.

Some option units include trips to relevant events or venues, such as theatres, exhibitions, libraries, which are optional activities.

Funding

Find out more about financing your studies and whether you may qualify for one of our bursaries and scholarships.

Money Matters

Want to know more?

How to apply

You can apply for this course for 2020 entry once applications open in UCAS.

Visit UCAS for further details, including deadlines.

 

You can review our current Terms and Conditions before you make your application. If you are successful with your application, we will send you up to date information alongside your offer letter.

MANCHESTER IS YOUR CITY. BE PART OF IT.

Programme Review
Our programmes undergo an annual review and major review (normally at 6 year intervals) to ensure an up-to-date curriculum supported by the latest online learning technology. For further information on when we may make changes to our programmes, please see the changes section of our Terms and Conditions.

Important Notice
This online prospectus provides an overview of our programmes of study and the University. We regularly update our online prospectus so that our published course information is accurate. Please check back to the online prospectus before making an application to us to access the most up to date information for your chosen course of study.

Confirmation of Regulator
The Manchester Metropolitan University is regulated by the Office for Students (OfS). The OfS is the independent regulator of higher education in England. More information on the role of the OfS and its regulatory framework can be found at officeforstudents.org.uk.

All higher education providers registered with the OfS must have a student protection plan in place. The student protection plan sets out what students can expect to happen should a course, campus, or institution close. Access our current Student Protection Plan.

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