BA (Hons) Joint Honours English and Philosophy

Attend an open day How to apply
Attend an open day How to apply

Overview

The Joint Honours BA English and Philosophy course route is distinctive because of its richly interdisciplinary approach to key ethical and intellectual challenges. BA English and Philosophy will be a popular joint honours combination which brings together two subjects with highly complementary approaches and interests.

As well as offering a balance of core and option units rooted in each of the two subjects, this course has been designed so that your growing knowledge and skills in each subject will help you develop a distinctive perspective and distinctive strengths in the other. Students will have opportunities to study abroad and, if they wish, to take their third year as a placement – in Britain or abroad. In their final year, students will have a chance to spread their wings with a substantial piece of project work that presents a thesis, building on the skills they’ve been developing over previous years. 

The English and Philosophy subject groups are staffed by internationally renowned writers and academics, and there’s a strong research culture, creating a learning environment that is both supportive and intellectually challenging. We pride ourselves on our excellent teaching and highly positive student feedback. And with our extensive cultural links both in Manchester and further afield, students are in the right place to begin building a network for their future.

This course has a Foundation Year available.

Features and Benefits

Career Prospects

Studying a joint honours degree gives you the opportunity to improve your employability by developing skills and knowledge in two subjects.

This course will help you to develop the ability to think critically, analyse ideas and articulate the conclusions reached. These skills are transferable to a wide range of careers including roles in business and management, public administration, community and social work, publishing, research and teaching.

Learn more about graduate careers

Entry requirements

UCAS tariff points/grades required

104-112

104-112 UCAS Tariff points from three A2s or acceptable alternatives. 

An English subject at GCE A Level is preferred, e.g. English Language, English Literature, English Language/Literature. Subjects such as Religious Education, History, Media Studies and General Studies will also be considered

Performing Arts, Production Arts or Creative Media Production are preferred from applicants studying BTEC qualifications

Specific GCSE requirements

GCSE English Language at grade C or grade 4. Equivalent qualifications (eg. Functional Skills) may be considered

Non Tariffed Qualifications

Pass Access to HE Diploma in a relevant subject with a minimum 106 UCAS Tariff Points -  units taken must include some element of literary or cultural study.

International Baccalaureate points

26

IELTS score required for international students

6.0 with a minimum of 5.5 in each element

There’s further information for international students on our international website if you’re applying with non-UK qualifications.

Course details

This Joint Honours degree provides students with an opportunity to study two subjects at degree level. The programme is carefully developed to balance modules from each of subject area with the modules tailored specifically for the Joint Honours students such as the Arts and Humanities project offered in Year 3.

In Year 1, you’ll explore a range of key topics to enable you to begin to develop a thorough understanding of English and Philosophy.

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

Death, God and the Meaning of Life

This unit examines some of the central arguments of the philosophical tradition for and against the existence of divinity. From Plato to the 20th Century, we will encounter various arguments for the necessary existence of the immortals, and see how they reconfigure how we understand the meaning of our lives and orient ourselves in the world. 

Approaches to Narrative 1

An introduction to the analysis of narrative forms and genres, focussing primarily on pre-20th Century texts.

Approaches to Narrative 2

An introduction to the analysis of narrative forms and genres, focussing primarily on 20th and 21st Century texts.

Metropolis 1: Reading Manchester (15 credits)

This unit introduces key skills for University study. You will learn skills of close reading and textual analysis, practised on a range of cultural forms and focussed on representations of Manchester as a diverse, international city.

Metropolis 2: Writing Worlds

An introduction to skills of research, writing and project development. You will develop your own independent project and put into practice the analytical skills developed on Metropolis 1: Reading Manchester.

Introduction to Classical Philosophy

Classical philosophy posed some of the fundamental questions of philosophy, questions about what it is to be human, what attitude we should have towards life and death, what is true and what is real. This unit will introduce students to these questions and, by examining the distinctive way in which they are posed in the works of the classical philosophers, it will help develop the ability to philosophise in response to them.

Introduction to Modern Philosophy

This unit will look at some of the key arguments of early modern philosophers about such issues as the nature of the mind and what it can know with certainty, the relation between the mind and the world, and what nature is. Through a close engagement with the writings of some of these philosophers, it will encourage students to think critically about our view of ourselves and our relation to the world.

Death, God and the Meaning of Life

This unit examines some of the central arguments of the philosophical tradition for and against the existence of divinity. From Plato to the 20th Century, we will encounter various arguments for the necessary existence of the immortals, and see how they reconfigure how we understand the meaning of our lives and orient ourselves in the world.

Existentialism

Students will study the rich tradition of Existentialism, which has asked what it means to exist authentically as an embodied, gendered, being in an absurd universe. While looking at the earlier existentialists, the unit will concentrate on a close engagement with the writings of some of the most influential 20th century existentialists such as Simone de Beauvoir, Albert Camus, and Jean-Paul Sartre.

In Year 2, you’ll continue to build on your knowledge and skills developed in Year 1. A range of option units will be available to you.

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

American Postwar Literature & Culture

A unit that is about reading in context, focussing on the relationships between aesthetic form, thematic content and the historical context in a diverse range of texts and genres from the 1940's-1970's.

American Contemporary Literature & Culture

You will practise reading in context, focussing on the relationships between aesthetic form, thematic content and historical context in a diverse range of texts and genres from the late 20th and early 21st centuries.

Greek Philosophy

This unit will focus on one key classical philosophical text (e.g. Plato’s Republic), examining it in terms of its historical and intellectual context. It gives students the opportunity to study how the earliest thinkers of the Western tradition thought about some of the most fundamental of all questions (e.g., what reality is and how we know it; what the best kind of life is and how we should best organise our societies).

History of Metaphysics

The unit addresses issues in metaphysics through the in-depth study of the key thinkers of the Early to late Modern period. It focuses principally on the Continental European tradition from Descartes to Leibniz and Kant. In addressing issues such as space and time, substance, reality, causality and personal identity, the unit examines the philosophical underpinnings of the Scientific Revolution in the 17th and 18th centuries. Students will come to understand the nature of metaphysical thinking and to comprehend the ways in which philosophical questions develop historically.

This course offers a placement year option which can be taken up in Year 3. During the placement year, although you will be supervised directly by the company you are employed by, you will also be allocated an Academic/Placement Tutor. They will provide support and guidance, assess your progress and generally monitor your welfare for the time you are away from the University.

Where a placement is not undertaken you will study the following final year units. Please note, these option units are indicative of what options may be on offer in Year 3 of this programme but may be subject to change.

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

Arts & Humanities Project

You will work with a supervisor to define an independent project on an appropriate topic of your choosing. You may focus on an academic subject or work with an external partner. Preliminary research will generate a detailed proposal, which will form the basis of a guided independent research-based project to produce an extended piece of work that presents a thesis. Your final submission will be an individual project that builds upon the skills you have developed on your course.

If you have completed a placement in Year 3 you will study the following final year units in Year 4.

Please note, these option units are indicative of what options may be on offer in Year 4 of this programme but may be subject to change.

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

Arts & Humanities Project

You will work with a supervisor to define an independent project on an appropriate topic of your choosing. You may focus on an academic subject or work with an external partner. Preliminary research will generate a detailed proposal, which will form the basis of a guided independent research-based project to produce an extended piece of work that presents a thesis. Your final submission will be an individual project that builds upon the skills developed on your course.

Assessment weightings and contact hours

10 credits equates to 100 hours of study, which is a combination of lectures, seminars and practical sessions, and independent study. A 3 year degree qualification typically comprises of 360 credits (120 credits per year). The exact composition of your study time and assessments for the course will vary according to your option choices and style of learning, but it could be:

Study


Assessment


Optional foundation year

Placement options

Placement opportunities are available both in the UK and abroad. Amongst others, students currently on placement are working in a variety of roles over a huge span of industries.

Our dedicated Placement Team has developed excellent links with various industries. You will be offered support through a preparation programme of activities that includes guidance on selection procedures, working overseas, CV preparation, interview and selection techniques.

Department of History, Politics and Philosophy

Our Department of History, Politics and Philosophy offers programmes of study alongside a thriving research culture, emphasising a student-centred approach to learning.

With interdisciplinary strengths in many areas, the department takes pride in its approach to research-led teaching and being able to provide opportunities for students to work with academics at the forefront of their disciplines.

More about the department

Taught by experts

Your studies are supported by a team of committed and enthusiastic teachers and researchers, experts in their chosen field. We also work with external professionals, many of whom are Manchester Met alumni, to enhance your learning and appreciation of the wider subject.

Meet our expert staff

Fees

Foundation Year students

UK, EU and Channel Island students: Full-time Foundation Year fee: £9,250 per year for the foundation year. This tuition fee is agreed subject to UK government policy and parliamentary regulation and may increase each academic year in line with inflation or UK government policy for both new and continuing students.

Non-EU international students: Full-time Foundation Year fee: £15,000 per year. When progressing from the pre-degree foundation year to the linked degree. Tuition fees will remain the same for each year of your course providing you complete it in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study)

UK, EU and Channel Island students

UK, EU and Channel Island students: Full-time fee: £9,250 per year. This tuition fee is agreed subject to UK government policy and parliamentary regulation and may increase each academic year in line with inflation or UK government policy for both new and continuing students.

Non-EU international students

Non-EU international students: Full-time fee: £15,000 per year. Tuition fees will remain the same for each year of your course providing you complete it in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study).

Additional Information

A degree typically comprises 360 credits, a DipHE 240 credits, a CertHE 120 credits, and an integrated Masters 480 credits. The tuition fee for the placement year for those courses that offer this option is £1,850, subject to inflationary increases based on government policy and providing you progress through the course in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study). The tuition fee for the study year abroad for those courses that offer this option is £1,385, subject to inflationary increases based on government policy and providing you progress through the course in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study).

Additional costs

Specialist Costs

£200

English and Philosophy are reading subjects and students must have access to a copy of all set texts. Primary texts are held in the University library but students often prefer to possess their own copy. Prices vary but many are cheaply available and set texts are often available online for no cost. Students often buy texts second hand, and there is a book exchange in the Atrium of the Manton building. Students may also need to print their assignments and other documents.

The programme offers from time to time optional opportunities for short study trips abroad of one week or less as part of our curriculum enrichment efforts. Students choosing to participate in such trips are expected to cover the costs of their travel and maintenance

Some option units include trips to relevant events or venues, e.g. theatres, museums, exhibitions, libraries. These are optional.

Funding

Find out more about financing your studies and whether you may qualify for one of our bursaries and scholarships.

Money Matters

Want to know more?

How to apply

Full-time applications through UCAS
Part-time applications - download an application form at www.mmu.ac.uk/applicationform

You can review our current Terms and Conditions before you make your application. If you are successful with your application, we will send you up to date information alongside your offer letter.

MANCHESTER IS YOUR CITY. BE PART OF IT.

Programme Review
Our programmes undergo an annual review and major review (normally at 6 year intervals) to ensure an up-to-date curriculum supported by the latest online learning technology. For further information on when we may make changes to our programmes, please see the changes section of our Terms and Conditions.

Important Notice
This online prospectus provides an overview of our programmes of study and the University. We regularly update our online prospectus so that our published course information is accurate. Please check back to the online prospectus before making an application to us to access the most up to date information for your chosen course of study.

Confirmation of Regulator
The Manchester Metropolitan University is regulated by the Office for Students (OfS). The OfS is the independent regulator of higher education in England. More information on the role of the OfS and its regulatory framework can be found at officeforstudents.org.uk.

All higher education providers registered with the OfS must have a student protection plan in place. The student protection plan sets out what students can expect to happen should a course, campus, or institution close. Access our current Student Protection Plan.

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