BA (Hons) Combined Honours English / Linguistics

Attend an open day How to apply
Attend an open day How to apply

Overview

The Combined Honours programme offers you an opportunity to study two subjects at degree level:

English:

English is a well-established humanities discipline, which explores the role of the written word in defining and transforming human experience. The modern discipline of English is rooted in the study of literature and the language in which it is written. Students of English can expect to study all major periods and forms of literature and to learn how to analyse literary texts by drawing on disciplines such as history, sociology and politics. The study of English develops strong critical thinking and communication skills, attributes that are highly valued in humanities graduates by employers. At the Manchester campus, the English department has access to a community of internationally renowned writers and critics through the Manchester Writing School, one of the most successful of its kind in the UK. Its Creative Director is the Poet Laureate, Carol Ann Duffy DBE. You will develop the necessary skills in critical thinking and communication that are of value to graduates entering a wide array of career paths.

Linguistics:

If you are interested in the way in which we communicate and how it can influence people, studying linguistics will help you unravel how language is inextricably linked to who we are. You will also experience the theoretical and applied use of linguistics in social, educational, and practical environments and contexts. We have been providing professional language courses for more than 30 years and our staff are nationally, and in many cases internationally, recognised experts in their field. Our strong local, national and global links will help to enhance your study and future employment opportunities.

Features and Benefits

Career Prospects

English graduates enter a wide range of employment, especially media work and teaching, where their transferable skills are particularly relevant.

Recent graduates have become school and college teachers, and gained employment in fields as diverse as banking and finance, manufacturing and retail.

There is also the opportunity to engage in further study and professional training, for example some of our graduates go on to study creative writing at postgraduate level in our Manchester Writing School under the creative direction of Poet Laureate Professor Carol Ann Duffy DBE.

However the opportunities for further study are diverse and some students have undertaken further professional training to work in law, public administration, management, and librarianship.

A language-focused degree allows you to learn many transferable skills that can be used in a multitude of jobs. Teaching, translation and interpreting are a popular pathway, but languages graduates are also sought after in many different industries, with recent graduates being offered positions in a variety of different sectors both in the UK and abroad. 

Learn more about graduate careers

Entry requirements

UCAS tariff points/grades required

104-112

104-112 UCAS Tariff points from three A2s or acceptable alternatives. 

Grade C or above in an English subject at GCE A Level is preferred, e.g. English Language, English Literature, English Language/Literature. Subjects such as Religious Education, History, Media Studies and General Studies will also be considered

Performing Arts, Production Arts or Creative Media Production are preferred from applicants studying BTEC qualifications

Specific GCSE requirements

GCSE English Language at grade C or grade 4. Equivalent qualifications (eg. Functional Skills) may be considered

Non Tariffed Qualifications

Pass Access to HE Diploma in a relevant subject with a minimum 106 UCAS Tariff Points -  units taken must include some element of literary or cultural study.

International Baccalaureate points

26

IELTS score required for international students

6.0 with a minimum of 5.5 in each element

There’s further information for international students on our international website if you’re applying with non-UK qualifications.

Course details

English:

This course takes an innovative, modern approach to the study of literature, focusing on drama, prose, fiction and poetry from the 17th century to the present, and balancing the traditional with the modern. There are opportunities to take units in creative writing, film and cultural theory, as well as writing from the USA, Ireland, Africa, India and the Caribbean. Students who have studied English literature or language appreciate the course's core interest in the analysis of literary language, and those with good qualifications from across the humanities perform just as well. We pride ourselves on our excellent teaching, flexible provision, highly positive student feedback and strong research culture.

Linguistics:

Linguistics is a popular course taken on its own or in combination with a language. Linguistics is devoted to the scientific study of natural language and concerned with how languages evolve, are structured and what they have in common. It also studies how languages are acquired and used. Our programme enables you to develop a sound knowledge of both theoretical and applied perspectives and places emphasis on English, with examples from other languages where appropriate.

The core elements of the course teach you about sentence structure (syntax), meaning (semantics and pragmatics) and pronunciation (phonetics and phonology). You will also learn about language use and variation in different social contexts, the media, and intercultural settings. Communicating effectively, critical thinking and developing rigorous analytical skills are valuable assets in the job market and are transferable to various professions.

Combined Honours Programmes offer students the ability to undertake two separate areas of study as either equal, major/minor or named route combinations. In the first year, students will study each subject combination equally and the core units for each unit are shown below.

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

Approaches to Narrative

This unit introduces the critical study of narrative, providing you with the appropriate critical skills and vocabulary with which to analyse different forms of prose narrative, introducing a range of texts from different historical periods, traditions and genres. It develops key skills in the areas of planning and writing essays, and supports structured reflection on the transition to university-level English studies.

Critical Dialogues
This unit introduces you to some key topics in critical and cultural theory and the critical and research skills required for the study of English at university level. The unit is an introduction to a number of key topics in critical and cultural theory and to a range of distinct approaches to the analysis of literary and cinematic texts.
Introduction to Linguistics
This unit seeks to introduce you to current trends in Linguistics where English language and, where appropriate, other languages are examined. The unit aims at enhancing your ability in analysing language and communication.
Fundamentals in Linguistics

The unit will form a solid grounding for an understanding of the role of linguistics as an academic subject and the importance of its different ramifications within society.  It will comprise of the following topics:

  • Theoretical Syntax
  • Phonetics-Phonology
  • Semantics and the role of meaning in communication
  • Morphology and word-formation

Units of study available across years two and three on a Combined Honours programme will depend entirely on the route taken through the programme and whether there are any additional requirements for study made by a particular professional or regulatory body. Please contact the Programme Lead for further information on the typical units of study offered for years two and three of this programme.

For an indication of units currently available, please see both English and Linguistics. Please be advised that the unit combinations and availability will differ depending on whether you choose to undertake a major/minor, equal or named route through your programme.

Units of study available across years two and three on a Combined Honours programme will depend entirely on the route taken through the programme and whether there are any additional requirements for study made by a particular professional or regulatory body. Please contact your Programme Lead for further information on the typical units of study offered for years two and three of this programme.

For an indication of units currently available, please see both English and Linguistics. Please be advised that the unit combinations and availability will differ depending on whether you choose to undertake a major/minor, equal or named route through your programme.

Assessment weightings and contact hours

10 credits equates to 100 hours of study, which is a combination of lectures, seminars and practical sessions, and independent study. A 3 year degree qualification typically comprises of 360 credits (120 credits per year). The exact composition of your study time and assessments for the course will vary according to your option choices and style of learning, but it could be:

Study
Assessment
Optional foundation year

Department of English

Our Department of English is a large, vibrant community of around fifty internationally renowned writers and critics, and is home to the Manchester Writing School and Centre for Gothic Studies.

As well as a solid grounding in the traditional core of the subject, the department offers a modern and innovative approach to the study of English, with all strands of its degree programmes offering the opportunity to study abroad for a term.

More about the department

Taught by experts

Your studies are supported by a team of committed and enthusiastic teachers and researchers, experts in their chosen field. We also work with external professionals, many of whom are Manchester Met alumni, to enhance your learning and appreciation of the wider subject.

Meet our expert staff

Fees

Foundation Year students

UK, EU and Channel Island students: Full-time Foundation Year fee: £9,250 per year for the foundation year. This tuition fee is agreed subject to UK government policy and parliamentary regulation and may increase each academic year in line with inflation or UK government policy for both new and continuing students.

Non-EU international students: Full-time Foundation Year fee: £14,500 per year. When progressing from the pre-degree foundation year to the linked degree. Tuition fees will remain the same for each year of your course providing you complete it in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study)

UK, EU and Channel Island students

UK, EU and Channel Island students: Full-time fee: £9,250 per year. This tuition fee is agreed subject to UK government policy and parliamentary regulation and may increase each academic year in line with inflation or UK government policy for both new and continuing students.

Non-EU international students

Non-EU international students: Full-time fee: £16,000 per year. Tuition fees will remain the same for each year of your course providing you complete it in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study).

Additional Information

A degree typically comprises 360 credits, a DipHE 240 credits, a CertHE 120 credits, and an integrated Masters 480 credits. The tuition fee for the placement year for those courses that offer this option is £1,850, subject to inflationary increases based on government policy and providing you progress through the course in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study). The tuition fee for the study year abroad for those courses that offer this option is £1,385, subject to inflationary increases based on government policy and providing you progress through the course in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study).

Additional costs

Specialist Costs

All of the books required for the course are available from the library. The University also has PC labs and a laptop loan service. However, many students choose to buy some of the core textbooks for the course and/or a laptop. Students may also need to print their assignments and other documents. Campus printing costs start from 5p per page. Estimated costs are £300 for a laptop up to £100 each year for books and printing.

Funding

Find out more about financing your studies and whether you may qualify for one of our bursaries and scholarships.

Money Matters

Want to know more?

How to apply

You can apply for this course through UCAS.

Apply now

UCAS code(s)

QQ31

Remember to use the correct institution code for Manchester Metropolitan University on your application: our institution code is M40

Full-time applications through UCAS
Part-time applications - download an application form at www.mmu.ac.uk/applicationform

You can review our current Terms and Conditions before you make your application. If you are successful with your application, we will send you up to date information alongside your offer letter.

MANCHESTER IS YOUR CITY. BE PART OF IT.

Programme Review
Our programmes undergo an annual review and major review (normally at 6 year intervals) to ensure an up-to-date curriculum supported by the latest online learning technology. For further information on when we may make changes to our programmes, please see the changes section of our Terms and Conditions.

Important Notice
This online prospectus provides an overview of our programmes of study and the University. We regularly update our online prospectus so that our published course information is accurate. Please check back to the online prospectus before making an application to us to access the most up to date information for your chosen course of study.

Confirmation of Regulator
The Manchester Metropolitan University is regulated by the Office for Students (OfS). The OfS is the independent regulator of higher education in England. More information on the role of the OfS and its regulatory framework can be found at officeforstudents.org.uk.

All higher education providers registered with the OfS must have a student protection plan in place. The student protection plan sets out what students can expect to happen should a course, campus, or institution close. Access our current Student Protection Plan.

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