BA (Hons) Combined Honours History / International Relations

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Clearing
2019

This course is now closed for applications for 2019 entry.

Check out our undergraduate prospectus to find a list of other courses we have available.

Overview

The Combined Honours programme offers you an opportunity to study two subjects at degree level, enabling you to benefit from high quality teaching across more than one subject.

History

Historical events have shaped the world we live in today. The past affects every aspect of our lives from the language we speak, to the politics of race, gender, religion and identity. History will provide you with the skills to explore the social and political landscape of human consciousness throughout time and place. You will discover how people lived, and how they perceived and interacted with the world around them. Investigating past events, you will encounter war, injustice, new frontiers, political upheaval, ancient civilisations, invasions, conspiracies, catastrophes and revolutions. Studying history at Manchester Met will allow you to enjoy a programme of study that offers a wide and fascinating scope of time and place, from the bustling streets of Ancient Athens and Rome to the missile silos of the Cold War.

International Relations

There is politics in almost everything we do. It is the study of power: who gets it, why they seek it, by what means they obtain it and what they use it for. Its principal focus is on power relations among individuals, social groups and nations. You will gain a firm grasp of political and current affairs, understand the news headlines, seeing beyond them to the real issues of politics, and be in a better position to comment upon and understand what the politicians are really saying.

Studying politics prepares you for life in the globally interconnected 21st century, exploring how the local, national and international intersect to influence both high and low politics, and questions of power and justice. You will also undertake practical skills training in advanced quantitative and qualitative analysis, to ensure you are fully prepared for the graduate job market.

This course has a Foundation Year available.

Features and Benefits

Career Prospects

Studying a combined honours degree gives you the opportunity to improve your employability by developing skills and knowledge in two subjects.

Opportunities for graduates may exist in the public and private sectors in areas such as management and administration, teaching, journalism and the media, and in central and local government. Other opportunities may exist in international institutions, voluntary organisations, political parties or the media. You could also progress to postgraduate study.

Learn more about graduate careers

Entry requirements

UCAS tariff points/grades required

104-112

Minimum of 104 UCAS Tariff points from three A Levels or equivalent (such as DMM on BTEC Extended Diploma)

Specific GCSE requirements

GCSE English Language at grade C or grade 4. Equivalent qualifications (eg. Functional Skills) may be considered

Non Tariffed Qualifications

Pass Access to HE Diploma in a relevant subject with a minimum 106 UCAS Tariff Points

International Baccalaureate points

26

IELTS score required for international students

6.0 with a minimum of 5.5 in each element

There’s further information for international students on our international website if you’re applying with non-UK qualifications.

Course details

History

The past holds a strong grip on the present, shaping our lives profoundly. On our programmes you will be introduced to a number of different approaches to the study of the past. This will give you the ability to look behind the headlines, question what you are told, and express your own opinions effectively. You will also be offered the opportunity to undertake collaborative projects with museums, galleries and other external partners, equipping you with practical, real-world experience and a competitive edge in the modern graduate jobs market. In the first year, you will be introduced to a broad range of historical periods and themes. In the second and third year, you can pursue your own areas of interest by choosing from a wide variety of option units. In the third year, the most important element is the independent project often based on original source materials.

International Relations

International Relations is concerned with the system through which power operates in the international arena; among individuals, within social groups and among nation states. Studying international politics means examining the key issues in today's world, from questions of war, peace and terrorism, to ethical questions of human rights and global justice, as well as understanding the nature of the globalised economy. It examines international institutions (such as the UN or World Trade Organisation), non-governmental organisations (NGOs), and campaign and pressure groups. We offer a variety of options to enable you to pursue your own interests, with increasing flexibility throughout the course. In the final year, you will engage with current academic debates and contemporary political developments. You will also have the option to undertake a dissertation in an area of your own choice, under one-to-one supervision. 

Combined Honours programmes offer you the ability to undertake two separate areas of study as either equal, major/minor or named route combinations.

In the first year, you will study each subject combination equally. Two core units for History, two core units for International Relations. The core units for year one are shown below.

History units:

  • The Rise of Persecuting Society
  • Aspects of World History

International Relations units:

  • Developments in Politics
  • Introduction to World Politics

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

The Rise of the Persecuting Society

This double unit looks at the issue of social control and the persecution of those who do not conform.  It examines many forms of oppression, often based on religion, race, gender or politics, and seeks to understand the reasons for the mistreatment of those groups who are identified as so-called threats.  A number of case studies are selected for detailed study, ranging in time and subject from the crusades, slavery and witchcraft, to 20th century examples such as the Holocaust or the history of Eastern Europe.  This unit also includes an introduction to information technology skills for historians.

Introduction to World Politics

The unit offers an introduction to the study of world politics, institutions and processes. It is divided into two sections. Section one considers the evolution of the state system and issues of global governance. Section two discusses issues of contemporary relevance such as poverty, gender, the environment and citizenship.

Combined Honours - Aspects of World History

You will choose one option from the following two units:

1. Introduction to Ancient History

This unit introduces you to the fascinating world of classical antiquity, and will focus particularly on both Classical Greece and Republican and Imperial Rome. The aim of the unit is not only to immerse you in the vibrant world of antiquity, to bring its classical civilisations to life, but also, through the textual, iconographic and material evidence those cultures left behind, to provide you with the skills required for further study of the ancient world.

This unit is split into three distinct blocks, each designed to introduce students to one aspect of ancient history. In the first block, students will be introduced to the fascinating world of ancient Greece. The second block of the unit explores Gaeco-Roman Egypt. In block three we move on to Rome. 

2. Aspects of World History: North America from Columbus to Civil War

In November 2012, the United States decided its first black president deserved a second term of office. This unit will help you to understand the history behind this momentous event. It focuses on the history of North America from the period of the first white contact through to the end of the Civil War in 1865. You will explore why white Europeans wanted to cross the Atlantic initially and look at the factors that determined the nature of colonies such as Virginia, Massachusetts and South Carolina, and their relationship with Britain. The other themes within this unit are American Independence and the creation of the United States, along with Slavery and the coming of the Civil War.

Developments in Politics (Europe)

This unit examines the organisation and development of European Union institutions and evaluates how these institutions have handled a range of issues, among them: problems in the Eurozone, the rise of euro-scepticism, Turkeys EU membership bid and the Syrian refugee crisis. The spread of democratic rule in Europe is also explored, focusing on transitions to democracy in southern and eastern Europe and the challenges to reform there, including threats posed by far right extremism, and the persistence of corruption. It also investigates the government and politics of European states and compares the impact and significance therein of factors such as: minority nationalism; the environment; religion; the politics of austerity and globalisation.

Units of study available in Year 2 of a Combined Honours programme will depend entirely on the route you wish to take through the programme and whether there are any additional requirements for study made by a particular professional or regulatory body. This is where you will begin to shape the learning of your degree to your own interests. 

You can continue with equal study (2 units from each subject) or choose a major/minor route (3 units from one subject, 1 unit from the other subject). You must study the core unit from each subject. 


Please note that your choice of units available to study may be informed by your study choice of equal or major/minor and, for some units, the grades you achieved in Year 1. Not all units are available for all study options.

Indicative History options available in Year 2 may be:

  • Empires in World History
  • Europe, Nazism and War, 1930-1945
  • Greeks and Romans: Living and Dying in Classical Antiquity

Indicative International Relations options available in Year 2 may be:

  • Evolution of Global Study
  • American Empire
  • Politics of the Arts

Please be advised that the unit combinations and availability will differ depending on whether you choose to undertake a major/minor, equal or named route through your programme. 

For an indication of units currently available please see our single honours degrees for unit details:

History

International Relations

Units of study available in your final year of a Combined Honours programme will depend entirely on the route you wish to take and whether there are any additional requirements for study made by a particular professional or regulatory body. This is where you will begin to shape the learning of your degree to your own interests. 

You can continue with equal study (2 units from each subject) or choose a major/minor route (3 units from one subject, 1 unit from the other subject). You must study the core unit from each subject. 

Please note that your choice of units available to study may be informed by your study choice of equal or major/minor and, for some units, the grades you achieved in Year 2. Not all units are available for all study options.

Indicative History options available in Final Year may be: 

  • Independent Project

Indicative International Relations options available in Final Year may be: 

  • Contemporary Political Issues: Theory and Practice

Please be advised that the unit combinations and availability will differ depending on whether you choose to undertake a major/minor, equal or named route through your programme. 

For an indication of units currently available please see our single honours degrees for unit details:

History

International Relations

Assessment weightings and contact hours

10 credits equates to 100 hours of study, which is a combination of lectures, seminars and practical sessions, and independent study. A 3 year degree qualification typically comprises of 360 credits (120 credits per year). The exact composition of your study time and assessments for the course will vary according to your option choices and style of learning, but it could be:

Study
Assessment
Optional foundation year

Department of History, Politics and Philosophy

Our Department of History, Politics and Philosophy offers programmes of study alongside a thriving research culture, emphasising a student-centred approach to learning.

With interdisciplinary strengths in many areas, the department takes pride in its approach to research-led teaching and being able to provide opportunities for students to work with academics at the forefront of their disciplines.

More about the department

Taught by experts

Your studies are supported by a team of committed and enthusiastic teachers and researchers, experts in their chosen field. We also work with external professionals, many of whom are Manchester Met alumni, to enhance your learning and appreciation of the wider subject.

Meet our expert staff

Fees

Foundation Year students

UK, EU and Channel Island students: Full-time Foundation Year fee: £9,250 per year for the foundation year. This tuition fee is agreed subject to UK government policy and parliamentary regulation and may increase each academic year in line with inflation or UK government policy for both new and continuing students.

Non-EU international students: Full-time Foundation Year fee: £14,500 per year. When progressing from the pre-degree foundation year to the linked degree. Tuition fees will remain the same for each year of your course providing you complete it in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study)

UK, EU and Channel Island students

UK, EU and Channel Island students: Full-time fee: £9,250 per year. This tuition fee is agreed subject to UK government policy and parliamentary regulation and may increase each academic year in line with inflation or UK government policy for both new and continuing students.

UK, EU and Channel Island students: Part-time fee: £2312.50 per 30 credits studied per year. This tuition fee is agreed subject to UK government policy and parliamentary regulation and may increase each academic year in line with inflation or UK government policy for both new and continuing students.

Non-EU international students

Non-EU international students: Full-time fee: £14,500 per year. Tuition fees will remain the same for each year of your course providing you complete it in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study).

Non-EU international students: Part-time fee: £3625 per 30 credits studied per year. Tuition fees will remain the same for each year of your course providing you complete it in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study).

Additional Information

A degree typically comprises 360 credits, a DipHE 240 credits, a CertHE 120 credits, and an integrated Masters 480 credits. The tuition fee for the placement year for those courses that offer this option is £1,850, subject to inflationary increases based on government policy and providing you progress through the course in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study). The tuition fee for the study year abroad for those courses that offer this option is £1,385, subject to inflationary increases based on government policy and providing you progress through the course in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study).

Part-time students may take a maximum of 90 credits each academic year.

Additional costs

Specialist Costs

All of the books required for the course are available from the library. The University also has PC labs and a laptop loan service. However, many students choose to buy some of the core textbooks for the course and/or a laptop. Students may also need to print their assignments and other documents. Campus printing costs start from 5p per page. Estimated costs are £300 for a laptop up to £100 each year for books and printing.

Funding

Find out more about financing your studies and whether you may qualify for one of our bursaries and scholarships.

Money Matters

Want to know more?

How to apply

This course is no longer available through clearing.

Check out our undergraduate prospectus to find a list of other courses we have available.

Check out our Clearing section to find a full list of courses we have available.

Full-time applications through UCAS
Part-time applications - download an application form at www.mmu.ac.uk/applicationform

You can review our current Terms and Conditions before you make your application. If you are successful with your application, we will send you up to date information alongside your offer letter.

MANCHESTER IS YOUR CITY. BE PART OF IT.

Programme Review
Our programmes undergo an annual review and major review (normally at 6 year intervals) to ensure an up-to-date curriculum supported by the latest online learning technology. For further information on when we may make changes to our programmes, please see the changes section of our Terms and Conditions.

Important Notice
This online prospectus provides an overview of our programmes of study and the University. We regularly update our online prospectus so that our published course information is accurate. Please check back to the online prospectus before making an application to us to access the most up to date information for your chosen course of study.

Confirmation of Regulator
The Manchester Metropolitan University is regulated by the Office for Students (OfS). The OfS is the independent regulator of higher education in England. More information on the role of the OfS and its regulatory framework can be found at officeforstudents.org.uk.

All higher education providers registered with the OfS must have a student protection plan in place. The student protection plan sets out what students can expect to happen should a course, campus, or institution close. Access our current Student Protection Plan.

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