BA (Hons) History

Discover humanity’s rich tapestry of successes and struggles – and equip yourself for a future career enriched by the past.

Attend an open day How to apply
Attend an open day How to apply

Overview

From ancient civilisations and great empires, to terrible battles and the roots of our modern society, history is a vast landscape to explore and understand.

The past is part of our every day lives, shaping our world profoundly. Study history and you won’t just learn about what happened in the past. You’ll develop a better understanding of the how and why of the events that make us who we are. In other words – you won’t just discover the story, you’ll investigate and interpret its sources, impacts and meanings.

This degree programme offers a roadmap for exploring the social and political landscape of human history. You’ll look at a huge variety of times and places – immersing yourself in wars and famine and poverty, charting technological leaps and social progress, and unearthing conspiracies, catastrophes and revolutions. And that’s just in your first year.

Staff researchers constantly work to search for new discoveries, fresh perspectives and unknown aspects of our history, bringing this history alive in the classroom. With this degree we give you the skills to understand the world and how this effects societal developments.

You will also have the opportunity to study abroad, including in the US, if you wish, and also the option to do your third year as a placement in Britain or abroad. 

This course has a Foundation Year available.

*From 2020 onwards, this course will also be available with a placement year option. See ‘Year 3’ in course details below for further information.

Features and Benefits

Career Prospects

Graduates may be employed in a wide range of industries including museums, galleries, heritage sites/historic houses, heritage organisations and charities, record offices, archives, building conservation, horticulture and nature conservation, national and local government, libraries and universities. Some graduates may also be interested in teaching after studying history at degree level, and go on to study for a PGCE (Postgraduate Certificate in Education).

Learn more about graduate careers

Entry requirements

These typical entry requirements apply to the 2019 academic year of entry and may be subject to change for the 2020 academic year. Please check back for further details.

UCAS tariff points/grades required

112

Minimum 112 UCAS Tariff points from three A Levels or equivalent (such as BTEC National Extended Diploma at Level 3 DMM or Advanced Diploma).

BBC

Specific GCSE requirements

GCSE English Language at grade C or grade 4. Equivalent qualifications (eg Functional Skills) may be considered.

Non Tariffed Qualifications

Pass Access to HE Diploma in a relevant subject with a minimum 112 UCAS Tariff Points.

International Baccalaureate points

26

IELTS score required for international students

6.0 with no element below 5.5

There’s further information for international students on our international website if you’re applying with non-UK qualifications.

Course details

Studying history at Manchester Metropolitan University will allow you to enjoy a programme of study that offers a wide and fascinating scope of time and place, from the bustling streets of Ancient Athens and Rome to the missile silos of the Cold War.

Students are offered the opportunity to undertake collaborative projects with museums, art galleries or other external partners, equipping you with practical 'real world' experience helping you gain a competitive edge in the graduate jobs market.

In Year 1 you will be introduced to a variety of historical periods and themes.

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

Global History 1: Empires, Migration and Cultural Encounters

This unit provides students with a fundamental survey of world history. It introduces students to the histories of relocation, encounter, empire, and migration that have shaped our world. It uses a comparative and transnational approach, via case studies, introducing general themes in the history of migration and cultural exchange associated with mobility, imperial expansions and post-colonialism.

Global History 2: Empires, Migration and Cultural Encounters

This unit provides students with a fundamental survey of world history. It introduces students to the histories of relocation, encounter, empire, and migration that have shaped our world. It uses a comparative and transnational approach, via case studies, introducing general themes in the history of migration and cultural exchange associated with mobility, imperial expansions and post-colonialism.

Radical Manchester 1

This unit examines the rise of the modern metropolis, focusing on Manchester, the world’s first industrial city. For 250 years, Manchester has been a place of innovation and change, where decisive societal developments often happened first, affecting people in Britain and across the globe with breath-taking intensity and speed. The city of Manchester is therefore a useful magnifier to study social, economic and cultural transformations of modern British, European, and wider world societies from the 18th to 21st centuries. Whilst focused on Manchester, the unit is comparative in its approach to other global regions over time and place.

Radical Manchester 2

This unit examines the rise of the modern metropolis, focusing on Manchester, the world’s first industrial city. For 250 years, Manchester has been a place of innovation and change, where decisive societal developments often happened first, affecting people in Britain and across the globe with breath-taking intensity and speed. The city of Manchester is therefore a useful magnifier to study social, economic and cultural transformations of modern British, European, and wider world societies from the 18th to 21st centuries. Whilst focused on Manchester, the unit is comparative in its approach to other global regions over time and place.

Questioning Humanity 1

This unit engages students with “Big Question” debates confronting human society, integrating key interdisciplinary concepts and debates essential to critically understanding and exploring our world along with disciplinary specific learning approaches to examining various aspects of past, present and future global societal development. Topics and questions examined can vary year to year.

Questioning Humanity 2

This unit engages students with “Big Question” debates confronting human society integrating key interdisciplinary concepts and debates essential to critically understanding and exploring our world along with disciplinary specific learning approaches to examining various aspects of past, present and future global societal development. Topics and questions examined can vary year to year.

History in Focus 1

This unit exposes students in their first year to areas of ancient, medieval/early modern, and modern history related to their potential bracketed award interests. The topics and subjects on offer can vary year to year.

History in Focus 2

This unit exposes students in their first year to areas of ancient, medieval/early modern, and modern history related to their potential bracketed award interests. The topics and subjects on offer can vary year to year.

In Year 2 you will have the opportunity to study a range of units. The optional units below are indicative of the type of units that will be available.

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

Reading History 1

On this unit, you will focus on the historian’s craft, namely the ability to gain key skills in research, analysis, evidence-based theory and the importance of historiography (understanding what others have written before about the past) within a comparative framework. At the end of the unit, you will have a completed independent project proposal for your final year of study. Part 1 of this unit provides students a grounding in the essential, generic skills of how to conduct academic research. Part 2 allows students to focus on their specific research passion and plans for independent research.

Reading History 2

On this unit, you will focus on the historian’s craft, namely the ability to gain key skills in research, analysis, evidence-based theory and the importance of historiography (understanding what others have written before about the past) within a comparative framework. At the end of the unit, you will have a completed independent project proposal for your final year of study. Part 1 of this unit provides students a grounding in the essential, generic skills of how to conduct academic research. Part 2 allows students to focus on their specific research passion and plans for independent research.

Critical Approaches to History 1

This unit exposes students in their second year to areas of history suited to their intended bracketed award specialism. Students will be able to choose from a menu of subjects in ancient, medieval/early modern and modern history. The topics and subjects on offer can vary year to year.

Critical Approaches to History 2

This unit exposes students in their second year to areas of history suited to their intended bracketed award specialism. Students will be able to choose from a menu of subjects in ancient, medieval/early modern and modern history. The topics and subjects on offer can vary year to year.

From 2020 this course will offer a placement year option which can be taken up in Year 3. Where a placement is not undertaken you will study the following final year units. The optional units below are indicative of the type of units that will be available.

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

Independent Project

A negotiated assessment, which takes one of several forms: for example a 10-12,000 word dissertation, a historical project in partnership with an outside organisation, or a product resulting from a work placement scheme (e.g. a museum).

From 2020 this course will offer a placement year option. If you complete a placement in Year 3 you will study the following final year units in Year 4. The optional units below are indicative of the type of units that will be available.

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

Independent Project

A negotiated assessment, which can take one of several forms: for example, a word dissertation, a historical project in partnership with an outside organisation, or a product resulting from a work placement scheme (e.g. a museum).

Assessment weightings and contact hours

10 credits equates to 100 hours of study, which is a combination of lectures, seminars and practical sessions, and independent study. A 3 year degree qualification typically comprises of 360 credits (120 credits per year). The exact composition of your study time and assessments for the course will vary according to your option choices and style of learning, but it could be:

Study
Assessment
Optional foundation year

Department of History, Politics and Philosophy

Our Department of History, Politics and Philosophy offers programmes of study alongside a thriving research culture, emphasising a student-centred approach to learning.

With interdisciplinary strengths in many areas, the department takes pride in its approach to research-led teaching and being able to provide opportunities for students to work with academics at the forefront of their disciplines.

More about the department

Taught by experts

Your studies are supported by a team of committed and enthusiastic teachers and researchers, experts in their chosen field. We also work with external professionals, many of whom are Manchester Met alumni, to enhance your learning and appreciation of the wider subject.

Meet our expert staff

Fees

Foundation Year students

UK, EU and Channel Island students: Full-time Foundation Year fee: £9,250 per year for the foundation year. This tuition fee is agreed subject to UK government policy and parliamentary regulation and may increase each academic year in line with inflation or UK government policy for both new and continuing students.

Non-EU international students: Full-time Foundation Year fee: £15,000 per year. When progressing from the pre-degree foundation year to the linked degree. Tuition fees will remain the same for each year of your course providing you complete it in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study)

UK, EU and Channel Island students

UK, EU and Channel Island students: Full-time fee: £9,250 per year. This tuition fee is agreed subject to UK government policy and parliamentary regulation and may increase each academic year in line with inflation or UK government policy for both new and continuing students.

UK, EU and Channel Island students: Part-time fee: £2312.50 per 30 credits studied per year. This tuition fee is agreed subject to UK government policy and parliamentary regulation and may increase each academic year in line with inflation or UK government policy for both new and continuing students.

Non-EU international students

Non-EU international students: Full-time fee: £15,000 per year. Tuition fees will remain the same for each year of your course providing you complete it in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study).

Non-EU international students: Part-time fee: £3750 per 30 credits studied per year. Tuition fees will remain the same for each year of your course providing you complete it in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study).

Additional Information

A degree typically comprises 360 credits, a DipHE 240 credits, a CertHE 120 credits, and an integrated Masters 480 credits. The tuition fee for the placement year for those courses that offer this option is £1,850, subject to inflationary increases based on government policy and providing you progress through the course in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study). The tuition fee for the study year abroad for those courses that offer this option is £1,385, subject to inflationary increases based on government policy and providing you progress through the course in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study).

Part-time students may take a maximum of 90 credits each academic year.

Additional costs

Specialist Costs

£600

Books and learning materials come to approximately £200 per year.

The Department offers from time to time optional opportunities for short study trips abroad of one week or less as part of our curriculum enrichment efforts. Students choosing to participate in such trips are expected to cover the costs of their travel and maintenance. 

Funding

Find out more about financing your studies and whether you may qualify for one of our bursaries and scholarships.

Money Matters

Want to know more?

How to apply

You can apply for this course through UCAS.

Apply now

UCAS code(s)

V100

Remember to use the correct institution code for Manchester Metropolitan University on your application: our institution code is M40

Full-time applications through UCAS.

Part-time applications - download an application form at www.mmu.ac.uk/applicationform.

You can review our current Terms and Conditions before you make your application. If you are successful with your application, we will send you up to date information alongside your offer letter.

MANCHESTER IS YOUR CITY. BE PART OF IT.

Programme Review
Our programmes undergo an annual review and major review (normally at 6 year intervals) to ensure an up-to-date curriculum supported by the latest online learning technology. For further information on when we may make changes to our programmes, please see the changes section of our Terms and Conditions.

Important Notice
This online prospectus provides an overview of our programmes of study and the University. We regularly update our online prospectus so that our published course information is accurate. Please check back to the online prospectus before making an application to us to access the most up to date information for your chosen course of study.

Confirmation of Regulator
The Manchester Metropolitan University is regulated by the Office for Students (OfS). The OfS is the independent regulator of higher education in England. More information on the role of the OfS and its regulatory framework can be found at officeforstudents.org.uk.

All higher education providers registered with the OfS must have a student protection plan in place. The student protection plan sets out what students can expect to happen should a course, campus, or institution close. Access our current Student Protection Plan.

Top