BA (Hons) International Relations with a minor route language

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Attend an open day How to apply

Overview

These courses give you the opportunity to study International Relations in combination with a language. You will undertake practical language classes for your minor language, while also developing an understanding of the social and cultural environment in which the language is spoken.

In the study of politics, historical background, socioeconomic indicators and ideological imperatives are analysed and cultural, gender and ethnic identities examined. You can study UK politics, political thought and International Relations theory, European politics, international politics and security, "issue" politics (for example, environmentalism or war and peace) and comparative politics.

Proficiency in modern languages will give you the competitive edge in the global jobs market. In both the private and public sectors, there is demand for professionals with strong language skills who can work in culturally diverse environments.

Minor languages available: 

French, Spanish, Modern Standard Arabic, Mandarin Chinese, German, Italian and Japanese. Visit the 'Course in depth' tab for more information on our minor languages and levels available. 

This course has a Foundation Year available.

Features and Benefits

Career Prospects

Most international relations graduates go straight into employment and/or further study. Previous graduates have gone in to a variety of jobs in the public sector (housing and education departments in councils, the police, the military), utilities, the financial sector, recruitment, journalism, media, non-governmental organisations, charities, development work, teaching, the law and academic research.

A language-focused degree allows you to learn many transferable skills that can be used in a multitude of jobs. Teaching, translation and interpreting are a popular pathway, but languages graduates are also sought after in many different industries, with recent graduates being offered positions in a variety of different sectors both in the UK and abroad. 

Learn more about graduate careers

Entry requirements

These typical entry requirements apply to the 2019 academic year of entry and may be subject to change for the 2020 academic year. Please check back for further details.

UCAS tariff points/grades required

104-112

If the language chosen is French or Spanish and has been studied at A Level (or acceptable equivalent) a Grade B (or equivalent) will be required

Specific GCSE requirements

GCSE English Language at grade C or grade 4. Equivalent qualifications (eg. Functional Skills) may be considered

Non Tariffed Qualifications

Pass Access to HE Diploma in a relevant subject with a minimum 106 UCAS Tariff Points

International Baccalaureate points

26

IELTS score required for international students

6.0 with no element below 5.5

There’s further information for international students on our international website if you’re applying with non-UK qualifications.

Course details

International Relations is concerned with the system through which decisions are made in the international arena with international institutions (like the World Trade Organization and the World Bank) and the relationship between these institutions and nation states. It is also about non-governmental institutions (NGOs): charities, pressure groups like Greenpeace and social movements like the World Social Forum. It is concerned with the study of power relations in the international arena amongst individuals, within social groups and amongst nation states. We offer you a variety of options to enable you to study units that suit you and in your final year, you will specialise and undertake a dissertation under one-to-one supervision.

Minor Language:

All of our minor language options focus on helping you to become an effective communicator. We will enable you to acquire linguistic skills and develop cultural awareness. We will also work with you to gain transferable skills such as translating and interpreting.

Modern Standard Arabic:

Arabic is spoken as the first language for over 300 million people; it is the official language and co-official language of 27 countries and it is one of the six official languages of the UN. The demand for studying Arabic has recently increased due to increased economic opportunities in the Middle East and North Africa. 

Admissions at Beginners level only. Applicants with other levels should contact the University directly to discuss options.

Mandarin Chinese:

Mandarin Chinese is the most widely spoken language in the world and China is the world’s second largest economy. Speaking Mandarin will allow you to communicate with millions of people around the world. In business, people who speak Mandarin have a distinct advantage with the Chinese market, as it is easier to develop all important relationships when you can speak the language.

Admissions at Beginners level only. 

German:

In Europe, more people speak German as their native language than any other language. It is the official language of Austria, Switzerland and Luxembourg, as well as Germany. As the world’s fourth largest economy, and the forerunner in Europe, Germany produces more than a quarter of the European Union's gross domestic product.

Admissions at Beginners level only. 

Italian:

Italy is the eighth richest economy in the world, a world leader in areas as diverse as tourism, architecture, fashion and football. Italy's cultural and economic significance within the European Union and beyond generates an increasing demand for competent and informed speakers of Italian. It is spoken by one in five Europeans, and by sizeable Italian communities in North and South America, and North Africa. 

Admissions at Beginners level only. 

Japanese:

Japanese is spoken by about 125 million people and the number of UK graduates who can communicate in Japanese and write Japanese scripts is limited, so learning the language will give you a competitive edge. Employment in UK enterprises owned by Japanese companies is steadily growing: with more than 120,000 in the UK in 2013 according to the UK Statistics Authority. 

Admissions at Beginners level only. 

French:

More than 75 million people speak French as their native language. French is also one of the official languages in Canada, Belgium, and Switzerland and is spoken widely across the North African countries of Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia. All told, there are more than 220 million French speakers worldwide, with French being one of the six official languages of the United Nations.

Admission from Beginners to GCSE, or A level with a grade B or above. 

Spanish:

Spanish is one of the most widely spoken languages around the world both in terms of the numbers of speakers, and the global geographical spread. As a global language, Spanish, with more than 400 million speakers, is second only to Mandarin in terms of the number of the world’s population who speak it as a first language. It has official status in 21 countries spanning Europe; Africa; North, Central and South America. As the economies of South and Central America continue to surge forward, and the political reach of these nations continues to grow and develop there has never been a more important time to consider studying Spanish.

Admission from Beginners to GCSE, or A level with a grade B or above. 

Combined Honours programmes offer you the ability to undertake two separate areas of study as either equal, major/minor or named route combinations.

In the first year, you will study each subject combination equally. The core units for year one are shown below.

International Relations units:

  • Approaches to International Relations
  • Global Chronicles: the rise of the International Order
  • Global Emancipatory Movements
  • Developments in Politics II 
  • Case studies in International Relations

Minor route language units:

  • Becoming Multilingual in the Digital Age
  • Minor route language suited to your level of proficiency

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

Approaches to International Relations

This unit introduces you to some of the foundational concepts and theoretical approaches that are employed in the discipline of International Relations. Applying concepts and theories to the world around us is something we do all the time, but quite often we are not even aware that we're doing it. Among other things, this unit will encourage you to reflect on your own use of theory and give you the tools to critically unpick and unpack the underlying assumptions of dominant approaches in the study of International Relations.

Becoming Multilingual in the Digital Age

The unit develops skills of critical enquiry and analysis, and communication for language learners. It will enhance your digital and intercultural literacy, preparing you for employment and citizenship in the contemporary world.

Global Chronicles: the rise of the International Order

This unit explore some of the key historical events in modern history in relation to the key debates that have dominate the study of International Relations. We will explore the political implications of which historical events are deemed relevant to international relations and how this shapes the way we look at the world. The unit will help students to identify significant continuities and changes in international relations over time.

Global Emancipatory Movements

Global inequality is one of the largest challenges facing our world today. Approaches to understanding the roots of inequality and how to address inequality are both varied and controversial. We'll explore these approaches in depth and talk about movements aimed at addressing some of the greatest challenges facing our world today.

Developments in Politics II

This unit explores contemporary political developments in Britain, Europe and the wider world. Content will vary from year to year and can include: post-war British politics, the organisation of the European Union and its impact on the member states citizens; Global democratic transitions world-wide, and contemporary democratic structures.

Case studies in International Relations

This course explores key contemporary issues in the world today and the debates within International Relations about how to address these global political challenges. Issues explored can include: global inequality, human rights, humanitarian intervention, the changing role of state, postcolonialism, modern warfare and terrorism.

Securities and Insecurities in Global Politics

The unit examines specific theoretical perspectives and practical challenges to global security, including the changing role of state, postcolonial perspective on poverty and humanitarian interventions, modern warfare and terrorism.

In Year 2, you will study one core unit plus two optional units from International Relations and one core unit from your chosen minor route language.

Please note, these option units are indicative of what options may be on offer in Year 2 of this programme and may be subject to change.

Indicative International Relations options available in Year 2 may be: 

  • Asking Questions and Finding Answers: Methods and Approaches to IR
  • International Relations Theory I
  • Manufacturing reality: Social Construction of Security

Indicative minor route language options available in Year 2 may be:

  • Minor route language suited to your level of proficiency

For an indication of units currently available from International Relations please see our single honours degrees for unit details:

International Relations

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

Asking Questions and Finding Answers: Methods and Approaches to IR

The unit looks into the philosophy of social science and how debates about the study of international relations change the kind of questions we ask and the approaches we use to find responses to those questions. The unit will examine the utility of a variety of methods and approaches starting with training in how to use and critique statistical methods, through game theory, feminist approaches and t narrative approaches. The unit will culminate by asking you to reflect on what you think should be the point of studying international relations.

International Relations Theory I

This unit will examine the development f International Relations Theory throughout the twentieth century. The unit will look at the historically dominant traditions of realism, liberalism and Marxism and then explore contemporary critical theories such as feminism, postcolonialism, poststructuralism and social constructivism. The unit will focus on key debates between theories and connections to the historical development of the field of IR.

Manufacturing reality: Social Construction of Security

The unit will analyse the processes and factors that shape public perception of security. In this unit, we will discuss why our understanding of security and insecurity varies through time and space. The unit will look at the role of media, propaganda, and ideology in social construction of security.

In your final year you will study one core unit plus three optional units from English and one core unit from your chosen minor route language.

Please note, these option units are indicative of what options may be on offer in Year 3 of this programme and may be subject to change.

Indicative International Relations options available in Final Year may be: 

  • Arts and Humanities Project

Indicative minor route language options available in Final Year may be:

  • Minor route language suited to your level of proficiency

For an indication of units currently available from International Relations please see our single honours degrees for unit details:

International Relations

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

Arts & Humanities Project

You will work with a supervisor to define an independent project on an appropriate topic of your choosing. You may focus on an academic subject or work with an external partner. Preliminary research will generate a detailed proposal, which will form the basis of a guided independent research-based project to produce an extended piece of work that presents a thesis. Your final submission will be an individual project that builds upon the skills you have developed on your course.

Assessment weightings and contact hours

10 credits equates to 100 hours of study, which is a combination of lectures, seminars and practical sessions, and independent study. A 3 year degree qualification typically comprises of 360 credits (120 credits per year). The exact composition of your study time and assessments for the course will vary according to your option choices and style of learning, but it could be:

Study
Assessment
Optional foundation year

Languages, Linguistics and TESOL

Languages, Linguistics and TESOL

Our Languages, Linguistics and TESOL section has a diverse community of international staff and students, and boasts strong local and global links to further enhance the quality of learning and opportunities available to its students.

The department’s Language Centre provides a wide range of development courses and is accredited by the British Council. It provides teaching in English, French, German, Spanish, Italian, Arabic, Mandarin Chinese, Japanese, Linguistics and TESOL with these subjects also available with Business, International Business and International Politics.

More about the department

Taught by experts

Your studies are supported by a team of committed and enthusiastic teachers and researchers, experts in their chosen field. We also work with external professionals, many of whom are Manchester Met alumni, to enhance your learning and appreciation of the wider subject.

Meet our expert staff

Fees

Foundation Year students

UK, EU and Channel Island students: Full-time Foundation Year fee: £9,250 per year for the foundation year. This tuition fee is agreed subject to UK government policy and parliamentary regulation and may increase each academic year in line with inflation or UK government policy for both new and continuing students.

Non-EU international students: Full-time Foundation Year fee: £15,000 per year. When progressing from the pre-degree foundation year to the linked degree. Tuition fees will remain the same for each year of your course providing you complete it in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study)

UK, EU and Channel Island students

UK, EU and Channel Island students: Full-time fee: £9,250 per year. This tuition fee is agreed subject to UK government policy and parliamentary regulation and may increase each academic year in line with inflation or UK government policy for both new and continuing students.

Non-EU international students

Non-EU international students: Full-time fee: £15,000 per year. Tuition fees will remain the same for each year of your course providing you complete it in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study).

Additional Information

A degree typically comprises 360 credits, a DipHE 240 credits, a CertHE 120 credits, and an integrated Masters 480 credits. The tuition fee for the placement year for those courses that offer this option is £1,850, subject to inflationary increases based on government policy and providing you progress through the course in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study). The tuition fee for the study year abroad for those courses that offer this option is £1,385, subject to inflationary increases based on government policy and providing you progress through the course in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study).

Additional costs

Specialist Costs

All of the books required for the course are available from the library. The University also has PC labs and a laptop loan service. However, many students choose to buy some of the core textbooks for the course and/or a laptop. Students may also need to print their assignments and other documents. Campus printing costs start from 5p per page. Estimated costs are £300 for a laptop up to £100 each year for books and printing.

Funding

Find out more about financing your studies and whether you may qualify for one of our bursaries and scholarships.

Money Matters

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How to apply

You can apply for this course through UCAS.

Apply now

UCAS code(s)

Remember to use the correct institution code for Manchester Metropolitan University on your application: our institution code is M40

You can review our current Terms and Conditions before you make your application. If you are successful with your application, we will send you up to date information alongside your offer letter.

MANCHESTER IS YOUR CITY. BE PART OF IT.

Programme Review
Our programmes undergo an annual review and major review (normally at 6 year intervals) to ensure an up-to-date curriculum supported by the latest online learning technology. For further information on when we may make changes to our programmes, please see the changes section of our Terms and Conditions.

Important Notice
This online prospectus provides an overview of our programmes of study and the University. We regularly update our online prospectus so that our published course information is accurate. Please check back to the online prospectus before making an application to us to access the most up to date information for your chosen course of study.

Confirmation of Regulator
The Manchester Metropolitan University is regulated by the Office for Students (OfS). The OfS is the independent regulator of higher education in England. More information on the role of the OfS and its regulatory framework can be found at officeforstudents.org.uk.

All higher education providers registered with the OfS must have a student protection plan in place. The student protection plan sets out what students can expect to happen should a course, campus, or institution close. Access our current Student Protection Plan.

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