BA (Hons) Multimedia Journalism

Attend an open day How to apply
Attend an open day How to apply

Overview

From breaking news to cultural reviews, sports reporting to in-depth investigations, we’ll help you scrutinise, interrogate and report on the issues that really matter.

This degree is geared towards inquiring minds and creative thinkers seeking a career in journalism and the creative media industries. Throughout the programme, we’ll encourage you to carve out your own creative identity as you express yourself through a variety of media and genres – including print, broadcast and digital publishing.

You’ll start with the core skills of interviewing and reporting, before going on to look at specialist areas like media law and ethics, magazine journalism, editing and production. You’ll also get the chance to work on live events and learn how to cover breaking news – all under the pressure of tight deadlines. 

In your third year you’ll be able to focus on your own particular interests, such as sports and music journalism. You’ll also create a portfolio of original journalism, rooted in the real world – real people, real issues, real events. 

Throughout it all, you’ll have access to the multimedia newsroom, TV studio and radio production facilities, getting you up to speed with all the latest technology. So, by the time you’re finished, you’ll have acquired the wide range of skills necessary to work in today’s multiplatform digital environments.

Features and Benefits

Career Prospects

The rapidly changing digital media and creative industries offer career opportunities in an extremely wide range of sectors including print journalism, digital publishing and editing, broadcasting, researching, media development, freelance writing, specialist journalism, working for news agencies, public relations departments and public sector press departments.

Previous graduates from our Information and Communications courses have been employed by new media companies not only across the North West but also nationally.

Learn more about graduate careers

Entry requirements

UCAS tariff points/grades required

104-112

Minimum of 104 UCAS Tariff points at A2 or equivalent (such as BTEC National Extended Diploma DMM at Level 3 or Advanced Diploma).

Specific GCSE requirements

GCSE English Language and Mathematics at grade C or grade 4. Equivalent qualifications (eg. Functional Skills) may be considered

Non Tariffed Qualifications

Pass Access to HE Diploma in a relevant subject with a minimum 106 UCAS Tariff Points.

International Baccalaureate points

26

IELTS score required for international students

6.0 with no element below 5.5

There’s further information for international students on our international website if you’re applying with non-UK qualifications.

Course details

On this vocationally-focused course, you will gain practical training in research and writing as well as broadcast, print and online production. Essential media law, media regulation and journalism ethics are also taught by a team of experienced journalists with many years' practical experience and excellent links to major media players including newspapers, TV companies, radio stations and digital publishers in Manchester and beyond. This ensures that what is learned on the course is informed by the latest trends and developments. You will also hear about the experiences and insights of working journalists, digital publishers and broadcasters.

The rapidly changing  digital media and culture industries offer many career opportunities in a wide range of industry sectors, including television, radio, film and digital media. The market for skills in these areas is strong and expanding, especially here in Greater Manchester, home to MediaCityUK.

Teaching is from experienced journalists with many years’ practical experience and excellent links to major media players including newspapers, TV companies, radio stations and digital publishers in Manchester and beyond. This ensures that what is learned on the course is informed by the very latest trends and developments in the media. Students will also hear about the experiences and insights of working journalists, digital publishers and broadcasters who will give regular talks and run workshops.

Teaching is via a combination of lectures, seminars and workshops as well as independent production work and research.

In Year 1 you study the following core units:

  • Journalism Skills: News Reporting
  • Journalism and Media in Society
  • Digital Publishing
  • Media Making for Journalists

 

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

Media Making for Journalists

This unit introduces the theory and practice of creating digital media assets for web pages. This will include industry standard methods of production, storage and use of digital video, audio and images. You will also have the opportunity to produce digital images, audio and video content as well as collaborate in the delivery of online content and media.

Journalism Skills: News Reporting

You will be introduced to, and develop, core journalism skills including news reporting, interviewing, reporting meetings, press conference and much more. There is also the opportunity to interview guest speakers and to attend and report on live events.

Journalism and Media in Society

You will learn about the history of the press and freedom of the press from the 17th century up to the development of new technology and present day practice, including multiplatform delivery, user-generated content and social media.

Digital Publishing

You will be introduced to the concept of digital journalism and its impact on the media industry. You will also be introduced to the practicalities of writing for the web. This will include a practical and theoretical understanding of the adaptation of conventional journalism to meet the demands of the digital age.

Option Units

Uniwide Language

You can add a foreign language to your portfolio of skills. Enhance your employability by learning Classical Latin, English (as a foreign language), French, German, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin Chinese, Modern Standard Arabic or Spanish alongside your main degree. Whatever your language knowledge, from Beginners to Advanced, these classes will take you to the next level of proficiency. Visit UNIWIDE for more information.  

In Year 2 you study the following 4 core units:

  • Magazine Journalism
  • Media Law and Regulation
  • Multiplatform Journalism
  • Editing and Production 

Alongside the units listed you can also continue to study a foreign language. Visit UNIWIDE for more information.

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

Magazine Journalism

This unit involves the design and creation of a print or digital magazine. The product will be created following examination and evaluation of a range of online and print magazines produced in the UK. The unit will build on previously acquired knowledge and skills, with students required to produce articles suitable for a stated readership. They will develop strategies for targeting required readership.

Media Law and Regulation

This unit covers the British Legal System including court procedure and reporting restrictions. Students will be introduced to key laws including the Defamation Act, Contempt of Court Act, Sex Offences Act, Children and Young Persons Act, Copyright Act and the Human Rights Act. The unit will also address legal and ethical issues regarding the protection of privacy and the right to report and will outline the role of the media's key regulatory bodies.

Multiplatform Journalism

Students will critically analyse and evaluate the production of news articles across a range of multimedia. They will evaluate target readerships and markets in print, online and broadcast sectors as well as at local, regional and national level. 

Editing and Production

For this unit you will undertake an evaluation of news values and style of presentation in national, regional and local press and equivalent digital sites. You will be introduced to editing, design principles and production software.

Option Units

Uniwide Language

You can add a foreign language to your portfolio of skills. Enhance your employability by learning Classical Latin, English (as a foreign language), French, German, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin Chinese, Modern Standard Arabic or Spanish alongside your main degree. Whatever your language knowledge, from beginner to advanced, these classes will take you to the next level of proficiency.

In Year 3 you study the following three core units:

  • Advanced Journalism
  • Law and Ethics for Multimedia Journalism
  • Journalism Portfolio

Plus you choose an additional unit from the options below.

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

Law and Ethics for Multimedia Journalism

Building on knowledge already acquired about key pieces of legislation affecting journalists, this unit will explore their impact through scenarios and practical exercises, examining the impact of the law across a range of platforms. The unit will also explore the legal, practical and ethical problems posed for journalists by social media in newsgathering and publishing. The unit will explore in depth a range of legal and ethical issues including protection of privacy and freedom of information, protection of confidential sources and reporting race and racist organisations.

Journalism Portfolio

This unit involves the design, research and creation of a long-form piece of original journalism within the scope of the multimedia journalism undergraduate programme area. This may be related to the subject matter from previously studied units or a new topic of the student's choosing. Students will select an overarching topic of social significance and produce four feature length articles as part of a portfolio of journalism all related to that central theme. They will produce a proposal for their portfolio early in the process which will identify a target audience/publication for their piece of journalism and outlining their research. The unit will use a blended learning approach, with some taught and/or online learning supported sessions to support the development of appropriate practical, professional and where necessary technical skills. The independent work will be supported by a supervisor.

Advanced Journalism

This unit further embeds the key concepts of Journalism to expert level, with a focus on advanced skills. It looks at the role of journalists within the current media landscape and how they contribute to it effectively, both as an individual and as part of a growing commercial venture. This unit involves the identification of an issue worthy of a single campaign or investigative-style piece of journalism and students will have the opportunity to work on real time live news events, operating in a newsroom environment and producing content to deadline. Advanced Journalism techniques will reflect current professional practice and equip students with the key skills, knowledge and insight to operate both collaboratively and independently. Understanding the role of newspapers and news websites in investigating and campaigning on behalf of audiences and the ability to undertake more advanced Journalism projects will further enhance employability.

Option Units

Sports Journalism

Content will provide students with a basic understanding of the world of sports journalism; insight into the often complex relationship between sports organisations/clubs and the media; an understanding of how sports news can also cross into the wider news agenda. Students will write match reports, news and feature items for various outlets, and appraise and analyse the differences in reporting of local, national and global events.

Language, Image, Media

This coursework-based unit promotes the development of an understanding of how linguistic and non-linguistic communication systems operate within mass media. It examines intercultural issues in specific settings such as politics, the corporate environment and the media. It equips students with the tools for carrying out empirical research, presenting findings and critically evaluating media discourse and cultural artefacts.

Uniwide Language

You can add a foreign language to your portfolio of skills. Enhance your employability by learning Classical Latin, English (as a foreign language), French, German, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin Chinese, Modern Standard Arabic or Spanish alongside your main degree. Whatever your language knowledge, from Beginners to Advanced, these classes will take you to the next level of proficiency. Visit UNIWIDE for more information.

Advanced Audio and Video

This unit will build on students' understanding of advanced audio and video skills and methods employed by journalists. It will explore the theory behind audio and video journalism in relation to contemporary debates. Building on operational techniques, including editing, research, interviewing, scripting and presentation students will critique content and consider ethical issues.

Music, Arts and Culture Journalism

This unit covers arts reviews and interviews across a number of forms and genres that represent art and cultural journalism. There will be opportunities to understand the role that arts journalism plays in context with other forms of journalism. The unit will engage students in a number of forms that typically make up arts and culture journalism. Whether that is for specialist magazines, broadcast organisations (such as the BBC) or newspapers . There will be opportunities to review performances or forms that are more tangible - such as books, DVDs, CDs etc. The sessions will enable students to build a portfolio of work that can be presented both in print and/or online. There will be options to specialise in a particular aspect consistent with the unit's themes.

Assessment weightings and contact hours

10 credits equates to 100 hours of study, which is a combination of lectures, seminars and practical sessions, and independent study. A 3 year degree qualification typically comprises of 360 credits (120 credits per year). The exact composition of your study time and assessments for the course will vary according to your option choices and style of learning, but it could be:

Study
Assessment

Journalism, Information and Communications

Our Journalism, Information and Communications section provides courses in the areas of information, library and information management, digital media, web development, communications and multimedia journalism.

The department’s history goes back nearly 70 years and it has an international reputation for excellence in teaching and research, working collaboratively with industry to develop partnership agreements in the public sector.

More about the department

Taught by experts

Your studies are supported by a team of committed and enthusiastic teachers and researchers, experts in their chosen field. We also work with external professionals, many of whom are Manchester Met alumni, to enhance your learning and appreciation of the wider subject.

Meet our expert staff

Fees

Foundation Year students

UK, EU and Channel Island students: Full-time Foundation Year fee: £9,250 per year for the foundation year. This tuition fee is agreed subject to UK government policy and parliamentary regulation and may increase each academic year in line with inflation or UK government policy for both new and continuing students.

Non-EU international students: Full-time Foundation Year fee: £14,500 per year. When progressing from the pre-degree foundation year to the linked degree. Tuition fees will remain the same for each year of your course providing you complete it in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study)

UK, EU and Channel Island students

UK, EU and Channel Island students: Full-time fee: £9,250 per year. This tuition fee is agreed subject to UK government policy and parliamentary regulation and may increase each academic year in line with inflation or UK government policy for both new and continuing students.

UK, EU and Channel Island students: Part-time fee: £2312.50 per 30 credits studied per year. This tuition fee is agreed subject to UK government policy and parliamentary regulation and may increase each academic year in line with inflation or UK government policy for both new and continuing students.

Non-EU international students

Non-EU international students: Full-time fee: £16,000 per year. Tuition fees will remain the same for each year of your course providing you complete it in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study).

Non-EU international students: Part-time fee: £3625 per 30 credits studied per year. Tuition fees will remain the same for each year of your course providing you complete it in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study).

Additional Information

A degree typically comprises 360 credits, a DipHE 240 credits, a CertHE 120 credits, and an integrated Masters 480 credits. The tuition fee for the placement year for those courses that offer this option is £1,850, subject to inflationary increases based on government policy and providing you progress through the course in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study). The tuition fee for the study year abroad for those courses that offer this option is £1,385, subject to inflationary increases based on government policy and providing you progress through the course in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study).

Part-time students may take a maximum of 90 credits each academic year.

Additional costs

Specialist Costs

All of the books required for the course are available from the library. The University also has PC labs and a laptop loan service. Students can borrow any audio-visual (eg camera, boom mike) or other technical kit they need from the MRL. Use of a smartphone (ideally an iPhone) is advised though not mandatory. However, many students choose to buy some of the core textbooks for the course and/or a laptop. Students may also need to print their assignments and other documents. Campus printing costs start from 5p per page. Estimated costs are £300 for a laptop and up to £100 each year for books and printing. No specialist equipment is needed.

Placement Costs

Any study trips will be funded from within the department.

Professional Costs

No membership of outside bodies is required for the course.

Other Costs

Students taking the sports journalism unit in their third year may be expected to take part in study placements at SportCity, for which they will pay their own transport. The cost would be minimal.

Funding

Find out more about financing your studies and whether you may qualify for one of our bursaries and scholarships.

Money Matters

Want to know more?

How to apply

You can apply for this course through UCAS.

Apply now

UCAS code(s)

2W31

Remember to use the correct institution code for Manchester Metropolitan University on your application: our institution code is M40

You can review our current Terms and Conditions before you make your application. If you are successful with your application, we will send you up to date information alongside your offer letter.

MANCHESTER IS YOUR CITY. BE PART OF IT.

Programme Review
Our programmes undergo an annual review and major review (normally at 6 year intervals) to ensure an up-to-date curriculum supported by the latest online learning technology. For further information on when we may make changes to our programmes, please see the changes section of our Terms and Conditions.

Important Notice
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