BA (Hons) Philosophy

Attend an open day How to apply
Attend an open day How to apply

Overview

Looking at Philosophy from every angle - from Ancient Greece to modern life - you will examine and unravel the meaning of life, the nature of reality and more.

Philosophers seek the answers to questions of universal importance, working to tackle issues around the nature of reality, our knowledge of the world and the truth of our existence. Throughout this programme of study, you’ll confront these questions and more, exploring the full scope and richness of the subject, from its historical roots to its relevance today.

Our academic team are experts in their field, offering a supportive and stimulating environment for learning. Sharing their passion for the subject, they will guide you through the full range of philosophical questions and different philosophical traditions – giving you a rounded, balanced understanding of the subject.

You will also have the opportunity to study abroad, including in the US, if you wish, and also the option to do your third year as a placement in Britain or abroad. 

This course has a Foundation Year available.

*From 2020 onwards, this course will also be available with a placement year option. See ‘Year 3’ in course details below for further information.

Features and Benefits

Career Prospects

Because philosophy teaches you not what to think, but how to think, its study naturally leads to the development of many skills that are highly prized by employers, for example the ability to think clearly, logically, and creatively, to communicate articulately and accurately (both verbally and in writing), and to analyse critically and rigorously.

A degree in Philosophy opens a wide range of career paths, from civil service, teaching and not-for-profits, to media, banking and recruitment. You can also go on to study at postgraduate level.

Learn more about graduate careers

Entry requirements

These typical entry requirements apply to the 2019 academic year of entry and may be subject to change for the 2020 academic year. Please check back for further details.

UCAS tariff points/grades required

104-112

Minimum 104 at A2 or equivalent (such as BTEC National Extended Diploma at Level 3 DMM or Advanced Diploma).

Specific GCSE requirements

GCSE English Language at grade C or grade 4. Equivalent qualifications (eg. Functional Skills) may be considered

Non Tariffed Qualifications

Pass Access to HE Diploma in a relevant subject with a minimum 106 UCAS Tariff Points

International Baccalaureate points

26

IELTS score required for international students

6 with no element below 5.5

There’s further information for international students on our international website if you’re applying with non-UK qualifications.

Course details

This course is available in two pathways: general ‘Philosophy’ and the more specialized ‘Ethics, Religion and Philosophy’, which concentrates on ethical values and the philosophy of religion, reflecting on Nietzsche's famous dictum that God is Dead and the contemporary problem of the relation between science and religion. The two pathways share a common first year and are flexible according to the interests developed by students during the course of their studies.

In Year 1, you’ll explore a range of key topics to enable you to begin to develop a thorough understanding of Philosophy.

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

Theoretical Ethics

What is it for an action to be right or wrong, and why should I be moral in the first place? This unit introduces and critically explains the central issues in theoretical ethics in order to enable students to evaluate the arguments, positions, and theories that underpin these questions, and develop their own metaethical position. Throughout, emphasis is placed on developing the critical, analytical and conceptual skills needed to comprehend the complexity of ethical debates in the modern world and to engage with them.

Introduction to Classical Philosophy

Classical philosophy posed some of the fundamental questions of philosophy, questions about what it is to be human, what attitude we should have towards life and death, what is true and what is real. This unit will introduce students to these questions and, by examining the distinctive way in which they are posed in the works of the classical philosophers, it will help develop the ability to philosophise in response to them.

Introduction to Modern Philosophy

This unit will look at some of the key arguments of early modern philosophers about such issues as the nature of the mind and what it can know with certainty, the relation between the mind and the world, and what nature is. Through a close engagement with the writings of some of these philosophers, it will encourage students to think critically about our view of ourselves and our relation to the world.

Death, God and the Meaning of Life

This unit examines some of the central arguments of the philosophical tradition for and against the existence of divinity. From Plato to the 20th Century, we will encounter various arguments for the necessary existence of the immortals, and see how they reconfigure how we understand the meaning of our lives and orient ourselves in the world.

Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion

Building on the insights gained in Death, God and the Meaning of Life, this unit will further investigate the questions of faith and knowledge as they have developed over the last 200 years and influenced the development of contemporary Philosophy of Religion and its significance in an increasingly secular culture.

Existentialism

Students will study the rich tradition of Existentialism, which has asked what it means to exist authentically as an embodied, gendered, being in an absurd universe. While looking at the earlier existentialists, the unit will concentrate on a close engagement with the writings of some of the most influential 20th century existentialists such as Simone de Beauvoir, Albert Camus, and Jean-Paul Sartre.

Questioning Humanity 1

This unit engages students with “Big Question” debates confronting human society integrating key interdisciplinary concepts and debates essential to critically understanding and exploring our world along with disciplinary specific learning approaches to examining various aspects of past, present and future global societal development. Topics and questions examined can vary year to year.

Questioning Humanity 2

This unit engages students with “Big Question” debates confronting human society integrating key interdisciplinary concepts and debates essential to critically understanding and exploring our world along with disciplinary specific learning approaches to examining various aspects of past, present and future global societal development. Topics and questions examined can vary year to year.

In Year 2, you’ll continue to build on your knowledge and skills developed in Year 1. A range of option units will be available to you. 

Please note, these option units are indicative of what options may be on offer in Year 3 of this programme but may be subject to change.

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

Greek Philosophy

This unit will focus on one key classical philosophical text (e.g. Plato’s Republic), examining it in terms of its historical and intellectual context. It gives students the opportunity to study how the earliest thinkers of the Western tradition thought about some of the most fundamental of all questions (e.g., what reality is and how we know it; what the best kind of life is and how we should best organise our societies).

Political Philosophy

Students will study one of the key texts of modern political theory (e.g., Machiavelli’s Prince, Rousseau’s Social Contract or Locke’s Second Treatise of Government). They will examine in detail some of the basic issues of modern political theory, such as the nature of democracy, the justification for sovereignty and the limits of government, and the origins of inequality and injustice.

History of Metaphysics

The unit addresses issues in metaphysics through the in-depth study of the key thinkers of the Early to late Modern period. It focuses principally on the Continental European tradition from Descartes to Leibniz and Kant. In addressing issues such as space and time, substance, reality, causality and personal identity, the unit examines the philosophical underpinnings of the Scientific Revolution in the 17th and 18th centuries. Students will come to understand the nature of metaphysical thinking and to comprehend the ways in which philosophical questions develop historically.

Analytic Metaphysics

This unit provides students with a thorough grounding in the central concepts and themes in analytic metaphysics. Students will reflect on the metaphysics of personal identity, objects, causation, consciousness, fictional kinds, free will, gender, race, and naturalism. In studying central concepts and themes in analytic metaphysics, students will balance their historical knowledge of Aristotle and Descartes, etc. with sustained engagement with the work of contemporary metaphysicians in the Anglo-American tradition.

From 2020 this course will offer a placement year option which can be taken up in Year 3. During the placement year, although you will be supervised directly by the company you are employed by, you will also be allocated an Academic/Placement Tutor. They will provide support and guidance, assess your progress and generally monitor your welfare for the time you are away from the University.

Where a placement is not undertaken you will study the following final year units. Please note, these option units are indicative of what options may be on offer in Year 3 of this programme but may be subject to chang

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

Independent Project: Philosophy

This unit allows students to undertake independent work on a topic of their choosing. The project will focus on a carefully defined area within philosophy, based on a student's interests and experience. Students work with an allocated supervisor, but they are expected to engage in independent study and reflection as part of their academic study. These kinds of projects are highly valued by employers, as students here demonstrate key transferable skills such as the ability to work independently, bringing together information from various sources and synthesising these into a coherent piece of work.

From 2020 this course will offer a placement year option. During the placement year, although you will be supervised directly by the company you are employed by, you will also be allocated an Academic/Placement Tutor. They will provide support and guidance, assess your progress and generally monitor your welfare for the time you are away from the University.

If you complete a placement in Year 3 you will study the following final year units in Year 4. Please note, these option units are indicative of what options may be on offer in Year 3 of this programme but may be subject to change.

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

Independent Project: Philosophy

This unit allows students to undertake independent work on a topic of their choosing. The project will focus on a carefully defined area within philosophy, based on a student's interests and experience. Students work with an allocated supervisor, but they are expected to engage in independent study and reflection as part of their academic study. These kinds of projects are highly valued by employers, as students here demonstrate key transferable skills such as the ability to work independently, bringing together information from various sources and synthesising these into a coherent piece of work.

Assessment weightings and contact hours

10 credits equates to 100 hours of study, which is a combination of lectures, seminars and practical sessions, and independent study. A 3 year degree qualification typically comprises of 360 credits (120 credits per year). The exact composition of your study time and assessments for the course will vary according to your option choices and style of learning, but it could be:

Study
Assessment
Optional foundation year

Placement options

From 2020 Placement opportunities are available both in the UK and abroad. Amongst others, students currently on placement are working in a variety of roles over a huge span of industries.

Our dedicated Placement Team has developed excellent links with various industries. You will be offered support through a preparation programme of activities that includes guidance on selection procedures, working overseas, CV preparation, interview and selection techniques.

Department of History, Politics and Philosophy

Our Department of History, Politics and Philosophy offers programmes of study alongside a thriving research culture, emphasising a student-centred approach to learning.

With interdisciplinary strengths in many areas, the department takes pride in its approach to research-led teaching and being able to provide opportunities for students to work with academics at the forefront of their disciplines.

More about the department

Taught by experts

Your studies are supported by a team of committed and enthusiastic teachers and researchers, experts in their chosen field. We also work with external professionals, many of whom are Manchester Met alumni, to enhance your learning and appreciation of the wider subject.

Meet our expert staff

Fees

Foundation Year students

UK, EU and Channel Island students: Full-time Foundation Year fee: £9,250 per year for the foundation year. This tuition fee is agreed subject to UK government policy and parliamentary regulation and may increase each academic year in line with inflation or UK government policy for both new and continuing students.

Non-EU international students: Full-time Foundation Year fee: £15,000 per year. When progressing from the pre-degree foundation year to the linked degree. Tuition fees will remain the same for each year of your course providing you complete it in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study)

UK, EU and Channel Island students

UK, EU and Channel Island students: Full-time fee: £9,250 per year. This tuition fee is agreed subject to UK government policy and parliamentary regulation and may increase each academic year in line with inflation or UK government policy for both new and continuing students.

UK, EU and Channel Island students: Part-time fee: £2312.50 per 30 credits studied per year. This tuition fee is agreed subject to UK government policy and parliamentary regulation and may increase each academic year in line with inflation or UK government policy for both new and continuing students.

Non-EU international students

Non-EU international students: Full-time fee: £15,000 per year. Tuition fees will remain the same for each year of your course providing you complete it in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study).

Non-EU international students: Part-time fee: £3750 per 30 credits studied per year. Tuition fees will remain the same for each year of your course providing you complete it in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study).

Additional Information

A degree typically comprises 360 credits, a DipHE 240 credits, a CertHE 120 credits, and an integrated Masters 480 credits. The tuition fee for the placement year for those courses that offer this option is £1,850, subject to inflationary increases based on government policy and providing you progress through the course in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study). The tuition fee for the study year abroad for those courses that offer this option is £1,385, subject to inflationary increases based on government policy and providing you progress through the course in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study).

Part-time students may take a maximum of 90 credits each academic year.

Additional costs

Specialist Costs

£200

Books and learning materials (approx. £200 per annum)

The Department offers from time to time optional opportunities for short study trips abroad of one week or less as part of our curriculum enrichment efforts. Students choosing to participate in such trips are expected to cover the costs of their travel and maintenance.

Placement Costs

We try to offer students the opportunity to go to Europe. The trip is optional and not directly related to the course, but it gives students the opportunity to meet other students within the Department of History, Politics and Philosophy, and to visit sites of historical, political and philosophical relevance.

Funding

Find out more about financing your studies and whether you may qualify for one of our bursaries and scholarships.

Money Matters

Want to know more?

How to apply

You can apply for this course for 2020 entry once applications open in UCAS.

Visit UCAS for further details, including deadlines.

You can review our current Terms and Conditions before you make your application. If you are successful with your application, we will send you up to date information alongside your offer letter.

MANCHESTER IS YOUR CITY. BE PART OF IT.

Programme Review
Our programmes undergo an annual review and major review (normally at 6 year intervals) to ensure an up-to-date curriculum supported by the latest online learning technology. For further information on when we may make changes to our programmes, please see the changes section of our Terms and Conditions.

Important Notice
This online prospectus provides an overview of our programmes of study and the University. We regularly update our online prospectus so that our published course information is accurate. Please check back to the online prospectus before making an application to us to access the most up to date information for your chosen course of study.

Confirmation of Regulator
The Manchester Metropolitan University is regulated by the Office for Students (OfS). The OfS is the independent regulator of higher education in England. More information on the role of the OfS and its regulatory framework can be found at officeforstudents.org.uk.

All higher education providers registered with the OfS must have a student protection plan in place. The student protection plan sets out what students can expect to happen should a course, campus, or institution close. Access our current Student Protection Plan.

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