BA (Hons) Joint Honours History and Politics

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Attend an open day How to apply

Overview

There is politics in almost everything we do. It is the study of power: who gets it, why they seek it and by what means they obtain it. Its principal focus is on power relations among individuals, social groups and nations. Studying history will help you to understand how past affects every aspect of our lives, - from the language we speak, to the politics of race, gender, religion and identity. The Joint Honours degree will provide you with the skills to explore the social and political landscape of human consciousness throughout time and place. You will discover how people lived, and how they perceived and interacted with the world around them. Investigating past events, you will encounter war, injustice, new frontiers, political upheaval, ancient civilisations, invasions, conspiracies, catastrophes and revolutions. You will gain a firm grasp of political and current affairs, understand the news headlines, seeing beyond them to the real issues of politics, and be in a better position to comment upon and understand what the politicians are really saying.

The Joint Honours degree offers you an opportunity to study two subjects at degree level, enabling you to benefit from high quality teaching across more than one subject.

A wide variety of options mean you can pursue your own interests – with things becoming increasingly flexible as you progress through the course. With practical skills training, including advanced analytical approaches, as well as placement and study abroad opportunities – with all the experience that brings – this degree opens doors to a range of interesting and rewarding career possibilities and provides the skills to progress to higher research programmes.

This course has a Foundation Year available.

Features and Benefits

Career Prospects

Studying a joint honours degree gives you the opportunity to improve your employability by developing skills and knowledge in two subjects.

Opportunities for graduates may exist in the public and private sectors in areas such as management and administration, teaching, journalism and the media, and in central and local government. Other opportunities may exist in international institutions, voluntary organisations, political parties or the media. You could also progress to postgraduate study.

Learn more about graduate careers

Entry requirements

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UCAS tariff points/grades required

104-112

Minimum of 104 UCAS tariff points from 3 A Levels or equivalent (such as DMM in BTEC Extended Diploma)

Specific GCSE requirements

GCSE English Language at grade C or grade 4. Equivalent qualifications (eg. Functional Skills) may be considered

Non Tariffed Qualifications

Pass Access to HE Diploma in a relevant subject with a minimum 106 UCAS Tariff Points

International Baccalaureate points

26

IELTS score required for international students

6.0 with a minimum of 5.5 in each element

There’s further information for international students on our international website if you’re applying with non-UK qualifications.

Course details

The proposed Joint Honours degree provides students with an opportunity to study two subjects at degree level. The programme is carefully developed to balance modules from each subject area, while allowing students to undertake an independent project in Year 3.

In Year 1, you’ll explore a range of key topics to enable you to begin to develop a thorough understanding of History and Politics.

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

Global History 1: Empires, Migration and Cultural Encounters

This unit, linked with Global History 2: Empires, Migration and Cultural Encounters, provide students a fundamental survey of world history. This module introduces students to the histories of relocation, encounter, empire, and migration that have shaped our world. The module uses a comparative and transnational approach, via case studies, introducing general themes in the history of migration and cultural exchange associated with mobility, imperial expansions and post-colonialism.

Global History 2: Empires, Migration and Cultural Encounters

This unit, linked with Global History 1: Empires, Migration and Cultural Encounters, provide students a fundamental survey of world history. This module introduces students to the histories of relocation, encounter, empire, and migration that have shaped our world. The module uses a comparative and transnational approach, via case studies, introducing general themes in the history of migration and cultural exchange associated with mobility, imperial expansions and post-colonialism.

History in Focus 1

This unit, with History in Focus 2, exposes students in their first year to subject choices in areas that can include Ancient History, Medieval and Early Modern History, European, American and World History. Students explore areas related to their potential interests. The topics and subjects on offer can vary year to year.

History in Focus 2

This unit, with History in Focus 1, exposes students in their first year to subject choices in areas that can include Ancient History, Medieval and Early Modern History, European, American and World History. Students explore areas related to their potential interests. The topics and subjects on offer can vary year to year.

Introduction to Methods in Politics

This unit will introduce students to different political processes and institutions, and will review the key research methods appropriate to comparative politics. The course will help students to identify appropriate approaches to data interpretation and presentation, and provide an opportunity for students to develop their own case study.  

Society and Community: An introduction

This unit develops students’ understanding of principles of social policy and concepts of social justice, social exclusion, difference and diversity, by using UK-based policy case studies and looking at future challenges for the state and its citizens

Introduction to Political Ideologies

This unit introduces students to the main contemporary political ideologies and contested concepts such as feminism, ecologism, human rights and terrorism.

Developments in Politics I

This unit explores contemporary political developments in Britain, Europe and the wider world. Content will vary from year to year and can include: post-war British politics, the organisation of the European Union and its impact on the member states citizens; Global democratic transitions world-wide, and contemporary democratic structures.

In Year 2, you’ll continue to build on your knowledge and skills developed in Year 1. A range of option units will be available to you.

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

Reading History 1

On this unit, with Reading History 2, you will focus on the historian's craft, namely the ability to gain key skills in research, analysis, evidence-based theory and the importance of historiography (understanding what others have written before about the past) within a comparative framework. At the end of the unit, you will have a completed independent project proposal for your final year of study. Part 1 of this unit provides students a grounding in the essential, generic skills of how to conduct academic research. Part 2 allows students to focus on their specific research passion and plans for independent research.

Reading History 2

On this unit, with Reading History 1, you will focus on the historian's craft, namely the ability to gain key skills in research, analysis, evidence-based theory and the importance of historiography (understanding what others have written before about the past) within a comparative framework. At the end of the unit, you will have a completed independent project proposal for your final year of study. Part 1 of this unit provides students a grounding in the essential, generic skills of how to conduct academic research. Part 2 allows students to focus on their specific research passion and plans for independent research.

Modern Political Thought I

This unit introduces the history of modern political thought from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment. Studying a series of 'classic' texts by a range of political thinkers, we will discuss different frameworks for understanding key questions in politics such as: why should I obey the state? What is political power, and how is it used? Students will learn critical skills to evaluate the thinkers examined with a focus on the social contract tradition.

Advanced Methods in Politics

This unit will help students to develop an understanding of research methods in politics. The unit will discuss both the limitations and advantages of quantitative and qualitative analysis for political research.

This course offers a placement year option which can be taken up in Year 3. During the placement year, although you will be supervised directly by the company you are employed by, you will also be allocated an Academic/Placement Tutor. They will provide support and guidance, assess your progress and generally monitor your welfare for the time you are away from the University.

Where a placement is not undertaken you will study the following final year units. Please note, these option units are indicative of what options may be on offer in Year 3 of this programme but may be subject to change.

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

Arts & Humanities Project

You will work with a supervisor to define an independent project on an appropriate topic of your choosing. You may focus on an academic subject or work with an external partner. Preliminary research will generate a detailed proposal, which will form the basis of a guided independent research-based project to produce an extended piece of work that presents a thesis. Your final submission will be an individual project that builds upon the skills you have developed on your course.

If you have completed a placement in Year 3 you will study the following final year units in Year 4.

Please note, these option units are indicative of what options may be on offer in Year 4 of this programme but may be subject to change.

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

Arts & Humanities Project

You will work with a supervisor to define an independent project on an appropriate topic of your choosing. You may focus on an academic subject or work with an external partner. Preliminary research will generate a detailed proposal, which will form the basis of a guided independent research-based project to produce an extended piece of work that presents a thesis. Your final submission will be an individual project that builds upon the skills developed on your course.

Assessment weightings and contact hours

10 credits equates to 100 hours of study, which is a combination of lectures, seminars and practical sessions, and independent study. A 3 year degree qualification typically comprises of 360 credits (120 credits per year). The exact composition of your study time and assessments for the course will vary according to your option choices and style of learning, but it could be:

Study

Assessment

Optional foundation year

Placement options

Placement opportunities are available both in the UK and abroad. Amongst others, students currently on placement are working in a variety of roles over a huge span of industries.

Our dedicated Placement Team has developed excellent links with various industries. You will be offered support through a preparation programme of activities that includes guidance on selection procedures, working overseas, CV preparation, interview and selection techniques.

Department of History, Politics and Philosophy

Our Department of History, Politics and Philosophy offers programmes of study alongside a thriving research culture, emphasising a student-centred approach to learning.

With interdisciplinary strengths in many areas, the department takes pride in its approach to research-led teaching and being able to provide opportunities for students to work with academics at the forefront of their disciplines.

More about the department

Taught by experts

Your studies are supported by a team of committed and enthusiastic teachers and researchers, experts in their chosen field. We also work with external professionals, many of whom are Manchester Met alumni, to enhance your learning and appreciation of the wider subject.

Meet our expert staff

Fees

Fees for this course have yet to be confirmed and will be updated as soon as more information is available.

UK and Channel Island students

The standard tuition fee for home and Channel Island students is set by the University subject to UK government policy and parliamentary regulation and may increase each academic year in line with inflation or UK government policy for both new and continuing students. For reference, the home fee for the full 120-credit 2019/20 academic year is £9,250.

EU and international students

The fees for EU and international students have not been confirmed for 2020, please check back for more details.

Additional costs

Specialist Costs

£200

Books and learning materials (approx. £200 per annum)

The Department offers from time to time optional opportunities for short study trips abroad of one week or less as part of our curriculum enrichment efforts. Students choosing to participate in such trips are expected to cover the costs of their travel and maintenance

Funding

Find out more about financing your studies and whether you may qualify for one of our bursaries and scholarships.

Money Matters

Want to know more?

How to apply

You can apply for this course for 2020 entry once applications open in UCAS.

Visit UCAS for further details, including deadlines.

Full-time applications through UCAS
Part-time applications - download an application form at www.mmu.ac.uk/applicationform

You can review our current Terms and Conditions before you make your application. If you are successful with your application, we will send you up to date information alongside your offer letter.

MANCHESTER IS YOUR CITY. BE PART OF IT.

Programme Review
Our programmes undergo an annual review and major review (normally at 6 year intervals) to ensure an up-to-date curriculum supported by the latest online learning technology. For further information on when we may make changes to our programmes, please see the changes section of our Terms and Conditions.

Important Notice
This online prospectus provides an overview of our programmes of study and the University. We regularly update our online prospectus so that our published course information is accurate. Please check back to the online prospectus before making an application to us to access the most up to date information for your chosen course of study.

Confirmation of Regulator
The Manchester Metropolitan University is regulated by the Office for Students (OfS). The OfS is the independent regulator of higher education in England. More information on the role of the OfS and its regulatory framework can be found at officeforstudents.org.uk.

All higher education providers registered with the OfS must have a student protection plan in place. The student protection plan sets out what students can expect to happen should a course, campus, or institution close. Access our current Student Protection Plan.

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