BA (Hons) Politics

Attend an open day How to apply
Attend an open day How to apply

Overview

The principal focus of this degree is power relations between individuals, social groups and nations – so you’ll explore how the local, national and international intersect to influence both high and low politics, as well as questions of power and justice. You’ll study a broad range of topics, from UK politics, political thought and theory, to international politics, international relations and ‘issue’ politics such as human rights, environmentalism, terrorism and conflict. 

A wide variety of options mean you can pursue your own interests – with things becoming increasingly flexible as you progress through the course. In the final year, you’ll engage more directly with current academic debates and contemporary political developments. Depending on what you choose to specialise in, you’ll have the option to graduate with the bracketed degree award of BA (Hons) Politics (Policy, Society and Community).

With practical skills training, including advanced analytical approaches, as well as placement and study abroad opportunities – with all the experience that brings – a politics degree opens doors to a range of interesting and rewarding career possibilities.

This course has a Foundation Year available.

*From 2020 onwards, this course will also be available with a placement year option. See ‘Year 3’ in course details below for further information.

Features and Benefits

Career Prospects

Graduates of politics possess a number of transferable skills that are highly valued in a wide range of employment sectors. Our former students have secured employment in areas as varied as the fast-track civil service, teaching, the armed forces intelligence corps, publishing, recruitment, journalism, media, charities, academic research and company management.

Learn more about graduate careers

Entry requirements

These typical entry requirements apply to the 2019 academic year of entry and may be subject to change for the 2020 academic year. Please check back for further details.

UCAS tariff points/grades required

104-112

Minimum 104 at A2 or equivalent (such as BTEC National Extended Diploma at Level 3 DMM or Advanced Diploma).

Specific GCSE requirements

GCSE English Language at grade C or grade 4. Equivalent qualifications (eg. Functional Skills) may be considered

Non Tariffed Qualifications

Pass Access to HE Diploma in a relevant subject with a minimum 106 UCAS Tariff Points

International Baccalaureate points

26

IELTS score required for international students

6.0. with no element below 5.5

There’s further information for international students on our international website if you’re applying with non-UK qualifications.

Course details

In the study of politics, historical background, socio-economic indicators and ideological imperatives are analysed and cultural, gender and ethnic identities examined. We offer a variety of options to enable you to pursue your own interests, with increasing flexibility throughout the course. Topics include UK politics, political thought and theory, European politics, international politics and international relations, 'issue' politics (e.g. human rights, environmentalism, terrorism and conflict) and comparative politics. In the final year, you will engage with current academic debates and contemporary political developments. You will also have the option to undertake a dissertation in an area of your own choice, under one-to-one supervision. 

In Year 1 you will study a variety of units:

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

Questioning Humanity 2

This unit engages students with “Big Question” debates confronting human society integrating key interdisciplinary concepts and debates essential to critically understanding and exploring our world along with disciplinary specific learning approaches to examining various aspects of past, present and future global societal development. Topics and questions examined can vary year to year.

Questioning Humanity 1

This unit engages students with “Big Question” debates confronting human society integrating key interdisciplinary concepts and debates essential to critically understanding and exploring our world along with disciplinary specific learning approaches to examining various aspects of past, present and future global societal development. Topics and questions examined can vary year to year.

Introduction to Methods in Politics

This unit will introduce students to different political processes and institutions, and will review the key research methods appropriate to comparative politics. The course will help students to identify appropriate approaches to data interpretation and presentation, and provide an opportunity for students to develop their own case study.  

Society and Community: An introduction

This unit develops students’ understanding of principles of social policy and concepts of social justice, social exclusion, difference and diversity, by using UK-based policy case studies and looking at future challenges for the state and its citizens

Developments in Politics I

This unit explores contemporary political developments in Britain, Europe and the wider world. Content will vary from year to year and can include: post-war British politics, the organisation of the European Union and its impact on the member states citizens; Global democratic transitions world-wide, and contemporary democratic structures.

Developments in Politics II

This unit explores contemporary political developments in Britain, Europe and the wider world. Content will vary from year to year and can include: post-war British politics, the organisation of the European Union and its impact on the member states citizens; Global democratic transitions world-wide, and contemporary democratic structures.

Introduction to Political Ideologies

This unit introduces students to the main contemporary political ideologies and contested concepts such as feminism, ecologism, human rights and terrorism.

Key Concepts in Politics

This unit introduces some of the key concepts used in political theory, such as the concepts of freedom, equality, democracy, and ideology. The course aims to develop the critical and reasoning skills of students, so that they can more fully ascertain the flaws and assumptions contained in contemporary political debate.

In Year 2 you will study a variety of units. The optional units below are indicative of the type of units that will be available.

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

Advanced Methods in Politics

This unit will help students to develop an understanding of research methods in politics. The unit will discuss both the limitations and advantages of quantitative and qualitative analysis for political research.

Political Analysis

The unit will look at a range of theoretical and methodological approaches. This unit will equip students with a range of tools needed to critically evaluate and apply theories and methods in Politics.

Modern Political Thought II

This unit develops the history of modern political thought since the late eighteenth century. We will discuss different frameworks (conservative, liberal, socialist, and others) for understanding some key questions in political theory. Questions that may be examined include: What is the role of tradition in politics? Is the personal political? Does democracy introduce the danger of a ‘tyranny of the majority’? How did the development of industrial societies transform the workings of political power? Students will reflect critically on the continuing significance of these issues in our own times.

Modern Political Thought I

This unit introduces the history of modern political thought from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment. Studying a series of 'classic' texts by a range of political thinkers, we will discuss different frameworks for understanding key questions in politics such as: why should I obey the state? What is political power, and how is it used? Students will learn critical skills to evaluate the thinkers examined with a focus on the social contract tradition.

From 2020 this course will offer a placement year option which can be taken up in Year 3. Where a placement is not undertaken you will study the following final year units. The optional units below are indicative of the type of units that will be available.

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

Contemporary Political Issues 2

The unit consists of a series of case studies informed by current research interests and findings of the politics and public policy teams. The case studies have a special focus on questions related to theory and/ or methods in politics, International Relations, political communication, and Public Policy. The unit has a bespoke structure designed to incorporate tailored bracketed awards linked to Politics, International Relations, Political Communication, and Public Policy.

Contemporary Political Issues I

This unit will teach students how to design and propose a  research project, evaluating questions of ethics, funding, impact, research relevance and methodologies. The unit also has integrated placement and work experience opportunities.

Option Units

Education Policy
The unit aims to explore the political environment within which the British educational system functions. It will critically examine a number of issues which have affected the development of education policy in the UK since the early 1960s.
The EU in Turmoil

The unit examines both internal and external contexts of European Integration. It is aimed to answer the following questions: what is the EU? How the decisions are made? What are the consequences of these decisions for the future development of European integration? What are the main internal and external policies of the EU? Among other things the unit examines the EU's response to such issues as global terrorism, climate change, financial crisis, immigration etc.

Contemporary Politics in the Middle East and North Africa

Political legacies of colonialism in the Middle East and North Africa, the concept of `Unity' and `Diversity' in Islam, political Islam and its influence in current politics, relations between the Islamic World and the West, in particular in relation to recent conflicts, enabling students to consider significant issues about unity and diversity, whilst gaining knowledge of major current events, and learning how to assess their validity.

The US and The Middle East

The unit examines US policy toward the Middle East since the end of the Cold War. After establishing the background, in the form of American relations with the region during the Cold War, the unit will focus on the following issues: US policy toward Iraq; US policy toward Iran; US policy toward the Israeli-Palestinian conflict; The War on Terror and US policy toward al-Qaeda and ISIS; the US and the Arab Spring and US policy toward the Syrian conflict.

Political Theory since 1918

This unit will consider the thought of leading political thinkers since the First World War, focusing on Hannah Arendt, Carl Schmitt, Pierre Bourdieu and Michel Foucault. The unit explores issues such as how to define the political (Arendt and Schmitt), forms of capital (Bourdieu) and the nature of social control via disciplining techniques (Foucault).

Latin American Politics

This unit offers both a historical background to, and analysis of, contemporary Latin American politics. The unit is in 2 sections -the first offers discussion of the institutions, processes and key factors which influence Latin American politics and the second offers in-depth analysis of individual Latin American countries.

Britain and World Politics since 1918: Aspects of British Foreign Policy

This unit focuses upon Britain's role in world politics to the present day. Topics examined include Britain and the Spanish Civil War, Britain and Palestine, Indian independence and the unwinding of empire, Britain and Europe, Anglo-American relations, British policy towards the Bosnian War, Blair’s foreign policy (Iraq and Afghanistan), the Arab Spring and the morality of humanitarian intervention in the Twenty First Century.

What's Going On? African-American Politics, Music and Culture

This unit focuses on the politics of the African-American community in the latter half of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.  It examines these politics especially as they have been mediated by various forms of cultural production: books, films and popular music.  As well as standard teaching methods, students will be presented with film, video, and audio material.

Independent Project

This unit enables you to complete an extended piece of work which develops your research skills and ability to analyse academic sources and empirical findings in an area of your own choosing. 

From 2020 this course will offer a placement year option. If you complete a placement in Year 3 you will study the following final year units in Year 4. The optional units below are indicative of the type of units that will be available.

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

Contemporary Political Issues 1

This unit will teach students how to design and propose a research project, evaluating questions of ethics, funding, impact, research relevance and methodologies. The unit also has integrated placement and work experience opportunities.

Contemporary Political Issues 2

The unit consists of a series of case studies informed by current research interests and findings of the politics and public policy teams. The case studies have a special focus on questions related to theory and/ or methods in politics, International Relations, and Public Policy.

Option Units

Britain and World Politics since 1918: Aspects of British Foreign Policy

This unit focuses upon Britain's role in world politics to the present day. Topics examined include Britain and the Spanish Civil War, Britain and Palestine, Indian independence and the unwinding of empire, Britain and Europe, Anglo-American relations, British policy towards the Bosnian War, Blair’s foreign policy (Iraq and Afghanistan), the Arab Spring and the morality of humanitarian intervention in the Twenty First Century.

The US and The Middle East

The unit examines US policy toward the Middle East since the end of the Cold War. After establishing the background, in the form of American relations with the region during the Cold War, the unit will focus on the following issues: US policy toward Iraq; US policy toward Iran; US policy toward the Israeli-Palestinian conflict; The War on Terror and US policy toward al-Qaeda and ISIS; the US and the Arab Spring and US policy toward the Syrian conflict.

The EU in Turmoil

The unit examines both internal and external contexts of European Integration. It is aimed to answer the following questions: what is the EU? How the decisions are made? What are the consequences of these decisions for the future development of European integration? What are the main internal and external policies of the EU? Among other things the unit examines the EU's response to such issues as global terrorism, climate change, financial crisis, immigration etc.

Independent Project

This unit enables you to complete an extended piece of work which develops your research skills and ability to analyse academic sources and empirical findings in an area of your own choosing. 

Education Policy

The unit aims to explore the political environment within which the British educational system functions. It will critically examine a number of issues which have affected the development of education policy in the UK since the early 1960s.

What's Going On? African-American Politics, Music and Culture

This unit focuses on the politics of the African-American community in the latter half of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.  It examines these politics especially as they have been mediated by various forms of cultural production: books, films and popular music.  As well as standard teaching methods, students will be presented with film, video, and audio material.

Latin American Politics

This unit offers both a historical background to, and analysis of, contemporary Latin American politics. The unit is in 2 sections -the first offers discussion of the institutions, processes and key factors which influence Latin American politics and the second offers in-depth analysis of individual Latin American countries.

Political theory since 1918

This unit will consider the thought of leading political thinkers since the First World War, focusing on Hannah Arendt, Carl Schmitt, Pierre Bourdieu and Michel Foucault. The unit explores issues such as how to define the political (Arendt and Schmitt), forms of capital (Bourdieu) and the nature of social control via disciplining techniques (Foucault).

Contemporary Politics in the Middle East and North Africa

Political legacies of colonialism in the Middle East and North Africa, the concept of `Unity' and `Diversity' in Islam, political Islam and its influence in current politics, relations between the Islamic World and the West, in particular in relation to recent conflicts, enabling students to consider significant issues about unity and diversity, whilst gaining knowledge of major current events, and learning how to assess their validity.

Assessment weightings and contact hours

10 credits equates to 100 hours of study, which is a combination of lectures, seminars and practical sessions, and independent study. A 3 year degree qualification typically comprises of 360 credits (120 credits per year). The exact composition of your study time and assessments for the course will vary according to your option choices and style of learning, but it could be:

Study
Assessment
Optional foundation year

Department of History, Politics and Philosophy

Our Department of History, Politics and Philosophy offers programmes of study alongside a thriving research culture, emphasising a student-centred approach to learning.

With interdisciplinary strengths in many areas, the department takes pride in its approach to research-led teaching and being able to provide opportunities for students to work with academics at the forefront of their disciplines.

More about the department

Taught by experts

Your studies are supported by a team of committed and enthusiastic teachers and researchers, experts in their chosen field. We also work with external professionals, many of whom are Manchester Met alumni, to enhance your learning and appreciation of the wider subject.

Meet our expert staff

Fees

Foundation Year students

UK, EU and Channel Island students: Full-time Foundation Year fee: £9,250 per year for the foundation year. This tuition fee is agreed subject to UK government policy and parliamentary regulation and may increase each academic year in line with inflation or UK government policy for both new and continuing students.

Non-EU international students: Full-time Foundation Year fee: £15,000 per year. When progressing from the pre-degree foundation year to the linked degree. Tuition fees will remain the same for each year of your course providing you complete it in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study)

UK, EU and Channel Island students

UK, EU and Channel Island students: Full-time fee: £9,250 per year. This tuition fee is agreed subject to UK government policy and parliamentary regulation and may increase each academic year in line with inflation or UK government policy for both new and continuing students.

UK, EU and Channel Island students: Part-time fee: £2312.50 per 30 credits studied per year. This tuition fee is agreed subject to UK government policy and parliamentary regulation and may increase each academic year in line with inflation or UK government policy for both new and continuing students.

Non-EU international students

Non-EU international students: Full-time fee: £15,000 per year. Tuition fees will remain the same for each year of your course providing you complete it in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study).

Non-EU international students: Part-time fee: £3750 per 30 credits studied per year. Tuition fees will remain the same for each year of your course providing you complete it in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study).

Additional Information

A degree typically comprises 360 credits, a DipHE 240 credits, a CertHE 120 credits, and an integrated Masters 480 credits. The tuition fee for the placement year for those courses that offer this option is £1,850, subject to inflationary increases based on government policy and providing you progress through the course in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study). The tuition fee for the study year abroad for those courses that offer this option is £1,385, subject to inflationary increases based on government policy and providing you progress through the course in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study).

Part-time students may take a maximum of 90 credits each academic year.

Additional costs

Specialist Costs

£600

Books and learning materials will cost approximately £200 per year.

The Department offers from time to time optional opportunities for short study trips abroad of one week or less as part of our curriculum enrichment efforts. Students choosing to participate in such trips are expected to cover the full costs of their travel and maintenance.

Funding

Find out more about financing your studies and whether you may qualify for one of our bursaries and scholarships.

Money Matters

Want to know more?

How to apply

You can apply for this course through UCAS.

Apply now

UCAS code(s)

L200

Remember to use the correct institution code for Manchester Metropolitan University on your application: our institution code is M40

You can review our current Terms and Conditions before you make your application. If you are successful with your application, we will send you up to date information alongside your offer letter.

MANCHESTER IS YOUR CITY. BE PART OF IT.

Programme Review
Our programmes undergo an annual review and major review (normally at 6 year intervals) to ensure an up-to-date curriculum supported by the latest online learning technology. For further information on when we may make changes to our programmes, please see the changes section of our Terms and Conditions.

Important Notice
This online prospectus provides an overview of our programmes of study and the University. We regularly update our online prospectus so that our published course information is accurate. Please check back to the online prospectus before making an application to us to access the most up to date information for your chosen course of study.

Confirmation of Regulator
The Manchester Metropolitan University is regulated by the Office for Students (OfS). The OfS is the independent regulator of higher education in England. More information on the role of the OfS and its regulatory framework can be found at officeforstudents.org.uk.

All higher education providers registered with the OfS must have a student protection plan in place. The student protection plan sets out what students can expect to happen should a course, campus, or institution close. Access our current Student Protection Plan.

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