BSc (Hons)

Criminology with Quantitative Methods

Attend an open day How to apply
Attend an open day How to apply

Overview

The BSc (Hons) Criminology with Quantitative Methods offers you the opportunity to specialise in quantitative methods in your final year. You will receive hands on training in quantitative methods and will be given the opportunity to undertake a real-world research project while on a placement in a local organisation. 

The academic discipline of criminology considers a range of questions relating to crime, deviance and social control that includes the academic study of law breaking, law enforcement and the re-integration of offenders into society. You will address a range of criminological questions, using a combination of theory and research methods. Topics include why individuals commit crime and how the key agencies that comprise the criminal justice system respond to criminal behaviour. You will consider young people, the law and the youth justice system, and how social characteristics such as gender, race and social class influence the ways in which the criminal justice system deals with offenders. 

Features and Benefits

“What will I do?"


“What will I gain?”

Career Prospects

Opportunities may exist in the established agencies of the criminal justice system (for example, the police, prisons and probation services or in the private sector companies that have undertaken the provision of criminal justice services).

There is also the potential to work in areas such as probation work, housing, family care and other roles in social services.

Other graduates have gone into administrative and managerial jobs in local or national government, or working for the voluntary sector.

Learn more about graduate careers

Entry requirements

These typical entry requirements apply to the 2018 academic year of entry and may be subject to change for the 2019 academic year. Please check back for further details.

UCAS tariff points/grades required

112

 Minimum 112 UCAS Tariff points from three A Levels or equivalent (such as BTEC National Extended Diploma at Level 3 DMM or Advanced Diploma).

A2 in a social science or humanities subject is required

Specific GCSE requirements

GCSE English Language and Mathematics at grade C or grade 4. Equivalent qualifications (eg. Functional Skills) may be considered.

Non Tariffed Qualifications

Pass Access to HE Diploma in a relevant subject with a minimum 112 UCAS Tariff Points

International Baccalaureate points

26

IELTS score required for international students

6.0 with no less than 5.5 in any component

There’s further information for international students on our international website if you’re applying with non-UK qualifications.

Course details

The academic discipline of criminology considers a range of questions relating to crime, deviance and social control, including:

What are the causes and consequence of crime?
What are society’s responses to crime, offenders and victims?
How are laws created and enforced?
How are crime and law-breaking defined?
What are the cultural and historical changes in constructions and responses to crime?

Criminology allows students to think about and address these questions. It provides students an excellent understanding of national and global trends in contemporary British society and situates crime within this context. Students are introduced to up-to-date and critical knowledge of the criminal justice processes and policies as well as the key agencies operating within it, such as the police, courts and prisons.

As students progress through this course, they will have increasing flexibility to pursue their own specific criminological interests through a range of optional units. The course is supported by the use of innovative teaching methods, particularly interactive learning, and students will develop a wide range of transferable skills, which will prove valuable for a wide range of graduate careers inside the criminal justice system and beyond.

In Year 1, you will study core subjects which address criminological theory, the philosophies and policies of punishment, as well as wider sociological theory and research methods.

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

Criminal Justice Now (30 credits)

Why punish? Criminal Justice Now is concerned with how different societies responds to 'crime', the functions and practices of criminal justice agencies and how punishment impacts upon particularly groups and individuals throughout the society.  This unit will focus on: Exploring the justifications of punishment; The Criminal Justice System; Theories of punishment and punishment impacts upon particular groups; What are the alternatives?; and Abolitionism and Restorative Justice. 

Contemporary British Society (30 credits)

This unit is a broad-based inter-disciplinary unit, (socio-cultural, legal political, economic,) which will allow you to contextualise your subject specific knowledge base (criminology, sociology). You will cover such topics as industrialisation; increasing State intervention and the politics of welfare; social welfare and social control; the role of the Media in the construction of social problems; and 'common sense' about causation and response.

Understanding Criminology (30 credits)

This unit will introduce you to the key theoretical perspectives and recent critiques relevant to the study of crime, criminology and social justice. You will examine popular assumptions of crime and criminality and how crime and deviance are socially and politically constructed. You will be given an overview of the historical development of the varied theoretical perspectives on crime and deviance and the relationships and tensions between theoretical traditions. 

Working with Quantitative Evidence (15 credits, term 1 only)

This is a hands-on unit that demonstrates how numbers are used (and abused) throughout society including examples from media, marketing and individual decision-making. You will be taught by a dedicated team of researchers from the Q-Step Centre, who take a step-by-step approach to making statistics accessible and engaging. The skills you develop on this unit are highly sought after by employers.  

Doing Qualitative Research (15 credits, term 2 only)

What is the best way to study such complex phenomena as the social world and human behaviour? Which methods, if any, produce 'true' knowledge? This unit addresses these questions through real-life research examples. Introducing a range of social scientific methods (including interviews and observation), this unit teaches students practical skills as well as knowledge about philosophies and ethics. 

In Year 2, the core subjects that you will undertake will further develop your social research skills and address approaches to UK crime control, and post-war developments in criminological theory.

You will also be able to select from a wide-range of optional units to study to complete the requisite number of units for the year.

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

Contemporary Issues in Criminology

This unit examines contemporary criminal justice policy and approaches to UK crime control with a focus on post-war developments in criminological theory. It will address key issues of crime prevention, governance and communitarianism.  Term 1 : Understanding community approaches to crime control Term 2: Critical issues in community crime control

Becoming a Social Researcher
This unit develops the social research skills introduced in Level 4. In term one, this unit focuses on the theory and practice of qualitative field research. In term two, this unit focuses on the theory and practice of secondary data analysis.

Option Units

Work, Leisure and Lifestyles: From Factory Floors to Nightclub Brawls Level 5

This unit seeks to critically explore the field in three blocks. Firstly, the classical concerns with work including theories from Marxism, Weber and Durkhei. Secondly, the more contemporary concerns with new forms of work and leisure spaces including studies of call centres, club cultures, sex work and door work, which utilises more postmodernist ideas of power, negotiated identity and subcultures. Thirdly, to explore the appropriate methodological ways to investigate work, leisure and lifestyle spaces and settings.

Engaging the Humanities and Social Science: Interdisciplinary Learning and Practice

This is an innovative cross-departmental unit which provides an opportunity to work in an interdisciplinary context alongside other students from a range of undergraduate programmes within the Humanities part of our Faculty.

Crime and Media Level 5

This unit familiarises you with the complex relationship between crime and the media, especially the importance of media discourses in terms of representing crime and shaping how crime is understood and dealt with in contemporary society. It covers topics such as: 1. Media representations of crime, criminals and criminality 2. Media fascinations and obsessions with crime 3. The power of the media to shape understanding and governance of crime.

EdLab Level 5 (30 credits)

EdLab units enable students to gain credit for project-based learning conducted in partnership with external practitioners, charities and social enterprises, educational providers and other workplaces. Their projects may be the development of products or resources, interventions or educational opportunities - but they will have real world value, and lead to real world impact with broad relevance to education. Tutored input for the unit will largely be facilitative and supportive, enabling students to develop, plan and evaluate projects. They will also be supported by a flexible lecture series which supports them with key aspects of project management - and which draw in guest speakers from external partner agencies, to share insights into their particular contexts and ways of working. The different levels of EdLab unit are distinguished by the extent to which students are expected to originate and take leadership over their projects and engagements. At level 5, students will collaborate as a cross-disciplinary team in a single sustained project. They will work with staff supervision, but under their own leadership as a team. They will scope, devise and implement a project - either responding to curated briefs and challenges from community partners, or through their own analysis of a particular context to recognise an opportunity. Through their work, students will develop their understanding of the creative process, and of project management, as it applies to educational enterprise. Students undertaking an EdLab unit at level 5 will be assessed according to the unit outcomes as they are translated onto the Level 5 University Standard Descriptors in the unit's assessment-specific marking criteria.

Intimate Relationships and Personal Life Level 5

This unit explores the impact of wider social changes within late modernity on personal lives and intimate relationships, paying attention to both change and continuity. It critically examines claims made by social theorists about the detraditionalisation of sexual relationships and the 'transformation of intimacy' into a matter of personal choice and satisfaction. Moreover, it considers empirical evidence suggesting that traditionally gendered roles, family structures and sexual practices are still dominant in British society. Topics covered in the unit include couple relationships, sexual practices, weddings and marriage, love, commitment, friendship, and family relationships.

Deconstructing Gender (Level 5)

This unit seeks to deconstruct our everyday understanding of gender and explores how gender is linked to violent and criminal behaviour. Unit topics include gendered identities and their relationship to violence; violent spaces and masculinities (war and military / violent sports); the experiences of women in contact with the criminal justice system as victims and offenders, and campaigning for justice. 

Consumption and Identity in Contemporary Society Level 5

This unit encourages you to reflect critically on contemporary consumer culture. The increasing commodification of everyday life is of chief consideration, along with the potential for alternative social, political and economic structures.

Crime, Deviance and Control Level 5

This unit critically examines traditional, contemporary and critical explanations for the causes of 'crime' and 'deviance' in British society. It investigates the State's response to 'crime' and 'deviance', especially why particular groups are the focus of criminal justice interventions. The unit encourages and enhances the students' understanding of society's attitudes towards 'crime' and constructions of the 'offender' within contemporary society. This includes reflecting on official policies and practices targeted at specific 'offenders', for example those defined as 'gang' members, sex offenders or 'rioters'.

Global Justice and Crime Control Level 5

This unit provides an introduction to international crime, transnational crime and crime control.  Competing theoretical approaches are examined and cross-national and international responses are contextualised. Your studies will include topics such as: Globalisation, cross-border crime and security; examining comparative criminology and criminal justice, social and historical context and the changing nature of security; theorising crime and its control in a global and transnational context;and examining the relationship between criminological and international relations perspectives on crime. 

The Politics of Imprisonment Level 5

This unit will critically examine the functions, purpose and justifications for the use of punishment and imprisonment. It will consider the legitimacy of the state's use of punishment and legitimacy. The unit will examine contemporary studies to develop a critical understanding of punishment, social control and imprisonment.

Victims and Restorative Justice Level 5

This unit looks at what it means to be a victim of crime and how people become recognised as victims.  It will also consider restorative justice and what it has to offer victims.  The unit begins by analysing the difference between victimisation and victimhood: who is the 'ideal victim' and how have real victims been viewed by criminologists and the criminal justice system? The second section of the unit takes a critical criminological approach to questions of victimisation and power. The third section of the unit assesses the position of victims in the criminal justice system.

Women's Lives: National and International Perspectives Level 5

An overview, comparison and analysis of gender and women's lives in varying societies. Issues include family, work, health, social change and women's movements. It covers topics such as: approaches to disadvantage and subordination; theoretical approaches to gender; discussions of social change and globalisation in relation to women's lives across the world.

World Without Borders Level 5

Analyses key issues in transnational studies: e.g. gender, migration, livelihoods, violent conflicts/war.  Discussion of key issues concerning globalisation and transnationalism - e.g. uneven development; the local and the global; relative weight of the economic, social and cultural. The unit then goes on to examine selected, specific topics including: changes in women's status, sexuality and family relationships; globalisation and livelihoods; migration and multiculturalism; wars and violent conflicts.

The Culture of Britishness Level 5

This unit explores British identities and British culture(s) in the contemporary moment. The major focus is on the negotiation of 'Britishness' in a multi-ethnic and diverse society.

Third World Studies

The unit includes an introduction to development studies; overview of global inequalities; social change in Africa, Asia + Latin America;Meanings of 'development' and progress; Colonialism and its impacts historically and in contemporary world; theoretical perspectives on development, underdevelopment; 'post-' development; and country case studies on S. Korea, China, Mexico and China focus on rural and urban processes, industrialisation and contemporary issues.

Sports, Politics and Globalisation Level 5

This unit critically examines the role of sport in society. The history of sport and links with key social, political and cultural contexts are explored, along with assessing the challenges and potential for sport in the contemporary world.  How sport has been positioned by sociologists, historians, politicians, the media and sporting cultures themselves, will provide a historical basis for the unit. 

Volunteering and Community Networking Level 5

You will undertake a volunteering opportunity for this unit. Theories of volunteering, policy and the community support this, and will be applied to your experience of volunteering. It also covers the voluntary sector (definitions, functions; funding); patterns of, and motivations for volunteering; issues of community, networking, social capital and social exclusion; social policy and the voluntary sector; political objectives and policy initiatives impacting on the voluntary sector; reflective practice and experiential learning as a means of enhancing employability.

‘Out of it’: Substance (Mis)use, Trends and Responses Level 5

This unit will develop your understanding of drugs, why people take them, trends and policy responses by enabling you to apply a range of perspectives.  The unit focuses on the UK but includes a comparative element that compares the levels of drug use and related policy responses to other countries. You will explore some key questions such as: Why do people take drugs? Who takes drugs? How can we make sense of drug use? How do societies respond to drug use? How has drug use changed over time? 

Policing in Britain within a Global Context Level 5

This unit provides an understanding of the social and historical development of policing, placing British policing within its national, regional and international context.  Your studies may include topics such as: National and International trends within policing; Globalisation, Governance and the policing of cross-border crime and security; Historical Contextualisation; Changing methods, structures and the delivery of policing.

Identity, Culture and Difference Level 5

This unit explores a number of theoretical approaches which place identity and difference at the centre of analysis. It covers topics such as: Debating Identity and Difference (social vs individual identity; histories and experiences); Globalised Identities and Culture (Globalisation, deterritorialisation, migration, diaspora and hybridity); and Post-Colonialism and Colonized Identities (social and political aspects of identities, post-Colonialism, Imperialism, Orientalism, gendered identities, non-western feminism, subaltern studies).

Youth in Crisis? Young People, Crime and Justice Level 5

This unit examines a range of issues relating to young people's experiences of crime and the youth justice system. The concepts of young people and crime are both social constructions. Young people are both seen in a positive light as enthusiastic and pursuing moral ideals and demonised as amoral and anti-social yobs. Similarly, the history of crime control demonstrates that those behaviours subject to formal censure and punishment are not a given but depend on at what point in history the act was committed; who committed it; who or what was the target; and in what wider social context was the act committed. This unit critically considers how these two aspects come together throughout history to position young people and crime in various ways. 

Media and Society Level 5

This unit examines the emergence and development of media forms and the impact of these on society and culture. Media forms including photography, film, television, recorded music and digital media are analysed.

Sociological Psychology Level 5

This unit explores the relationship between mind, self and society from a sociological perspective. It covers the relationship between the self and society and proposes that the self is not innate but emerges in and through social interaction and our culturally-shared symbolic system. A sociological perspective conceives of identities as socially-bestowed, socially-sustained, socially-transformed and even socially-rescinded in and through interactional processes and contexts. Self is viewed as a constantly-evolving social process. 

Race, Racism and Society Level 5

This unit provides an introduction to the sociological study of race, racism and processes of racialisation. The unit includes topics such as socio-historical development of the concept of race in Western / European societies. The impact of globalisation in terms of migration, economic and socio-political factors in Britain. Implications and impacts of patterns of mass migration to Britain after the Second  World War. A study of media representation of race and racism. A study of race, racism and policing. Theories of racial conflict, multiculturalism, race relations and immigration explored within the context of British society.

In Year 3 you will study three core units and can choose one option from a wide range of optional units to suit your preference.

Read more about this year of study

Core Units

Quantitative Data Analysis

The unit focuses on the theory and practice of quantitative secondary data analysis of large datasets, specifically using regression techniques.

In term one, you will recap the quantitative skills covered in Level 5 and then move on to advancing these skills via the learning of multiple regression techniques. In addition, you will be introduced to a small number of case studies to explore the intersections between theory and methods. In term 2, you will select a specific case study (and accompanying data set) on which to base your own piece of data analysis.

The Criminological Imagination

This unit allows students to select four topics, two of which are studied in the first term and the other two of which are studied in the second term. Term 1 units are assessed by essays and term 2 units by an examination. The units that are offered (which are revised on an annual basis) are designed to allow students to explore contemporary issues and debates within the subject area of criminology, drawing upon a wide variety of criminological perspectives. 

Applied Quantitative Dissertation

This unit will provide the opportunity to research and produce a sustained, in-depth, piece of scholarly work based on a specific topic of study using quantitative methods. For this you will work with a community organisation and the choice of topic will be negotiated in conjunction with that organisation. We have a substantial list of community organisation available for you to work with which include Her Majesties Inspectorate of Probation, British Red Cross, Manchester City and Manchester United Football Club, Trafford Citizen's Advice Bureau, Manchester Probation Service, the Childrens Society, The Boys and Girls Clubs of Greater Manchester.  The final submitted dissertation is around 10,000 words in length.

Option Units

Policing in Britain within a Global Context Level 6

This unit provides an understanding of the social and historical development of policing, placing British policing within its national, regional and international context.  Your studies may include topics such as: National and International trends within policing; Globalisation, Governance and the policing of cross-border crime and security; Historical Contextualisation; Changing methods, structures and the delivery of policing; and cooperation, consent, legitimacy and accountability.

Work, Leisure and Lifestyles: From Factory Floors to Nightclub Brawls Level 6

This unit seeks to critically explore the field in three blocks. Firstly, the classical concerns with work including theories from Marxism, Weber and Durkhei. Secondly, the more contemporary concerns with new forms of work and leisure spaces including studies of call centres, club cultures, sex work and door work, which utilises more postmodernist ideas of power, negotiated identity and subcultures. Thirdly, to explore the appropriate methodological ways to investigate work, leisure and lifestyle spaces and settings.

Crime, Deviance and Control Level 6

This unit critically examines traditional, contemporary and critical explanations for the causes of 'crime' and 'deviance' in British society. It investigates the States response to 'crime' and 'deviance', especially why particular groups are the focus of criminal justice interventions. The unit encourages and enhances the students understanding of society's attitudes towards 'crime' and constructions of the 'offender' within contemporary society. This includes reflecting on official policies and practices targeted at specific 'offenders', for example those defined as 'gang' members, sex offenders or 'rioters'.

Identity, Culture and Difference Level 6

This unit explores a number of theoretical approaches which place identity and difference at the centre of analysis. It covers topics such as: Debating Identity and Difference (social vs individual identity; histories and experiences); Globalised Identities and Culture (Globalisation, deterritorialisation, migration, diaspora and hybridity); and Post-Colonialism and Colonized Identities (social and political aspects of identities, post-Colonialism, Imperialism, Orientalism, gendered identities, non-western feminism, sub-altern studies).

Sports, Politics and Globalisation Level 6

This unit critically examines the role of sport in society. The history of sport and links with key social, political and cultural contexts are explored, along with assessing the challenges and potential for sport in the contemporary world.  How sport has been positioned by sociologists, historians, politicians, the media and sporting cultures themselves, will provide a historical basis for the unit. 

Race, Racism and Society Level 6

This unit provides an introduction to the sociological study of race, racism and processes of racialisation. The unit includes topics such as socio-historical development of the concept of race in Western / European societies. The impact of globalisation in terms of migration, economic and socio-political factors in Britain. Implications and impacts of patterns of mass migration to Britain after the Second World War. A study of media representation of race and racism. A study of race, racism and policing. Theories of racial conflict, multiculturalism, race relations and immigration explored within the context of British society.

Working with Offenders

This unit considers the work of criminal justice agencies (notably Probation, Prisons & YOTs) to manage offenders and promote change; includes practice, theory and research.  The unit explores work with offenders to reduce re-offending and manage risk within the modern criminal justice context.  Your studies will include topics such as: Desistance from offending: theory and research;  Underpinning principles and historical development of work with offenders; Impact of modern criminal justice priorities on approaches to working with offenders; Management of dangerous offenders; Research into 'what works' to reduce re-offending and Role of assessment.

Economics and Crime

The economics of crime is an area of growing activity and concern, increasingly influential both to the study of crime and criminal justice and to the formulation of crime reduction and criminal justice policy.  The module includes an introduction to basic economic concepts and explores how they can be applied to the study of crime and criminality. It also provides a detailed discussion of rationality as an economic concept and its development as a strand of some criminological theories such as Rational Choice theory and Routine Activities theory. 

Victims and Restorative Justice Level 6

This unit looks at what it means to be a victim of crime and how people become recognised as victims.  It will also consider restorative justice and what it has to offer victims.  The unit begins by analysing the difference between victimisation and victimhood: who is the 'ideal victim' and how have real victims been viewed by criminologists and the criminal justice system? The second section of the unit takes a critical criminological approach to questions of victimisation and power. The third section of the unit assesses the position of victims in the criminal justice system.

Global Justice and Crime Control Level 6

This unit provides an introduction to international crime, transnational crime and crime control.  Competing theoretical approaches are examined and cross-national and international responses are contextualised. Your studies will include topics such as: Globalisation, cross-border crime and security; examining comparative criminology and criminal justice, social and historical context and the changing nature of security; theorising crime and its control in a global and transnational context;and examining the relationship between criminological and international relations perspectives on crime.

Deconstructing Gender (Level 6)

This unit seeks to deconstruct our everyday understanding of gender and explores how gender is linked to violent and criminal behaviour. Unit topics include gendered identities and their relationship to violence; violent spaces and masculinities (war and military / violent sports); the experiences of women in contact with the criminal justice system as victims and offenders, and campaigning for justice. 

Intimate Relationships and Personal Life Level 6

This unit explores the impact of wider social changes within late modernity on personal lives and intimate relationships, paying attention to both change and continuity. It critically examines claims made by social theorists about the detraditionalisation of sexual relationships and the 'transformation of intimacy' into a matter of personal choice and satisfaction. Moreover, it considers empirical evidence suggesting that traditionally gendered roles, family structures and sexual practices are still dominant in British society. Topics covered in the unit include couple relationships, sexual practices, weddings and marriage, love, commitment, friendship, and family relationships.

‘Out of it’: Substance (Mis)use, Trends and Responses Level 6

This unit will develop your understanding of drugs, why people take them, trends and policy responses by enabling you to apply a range of perspectives.  The unit focuses on the UK but includes a comparative element that compares the levels of drug use and related policy responses to other countries. You will explore some key questions such as: Why do people take drugs? Who takes drugs? How can we make sense of drug use? How do societies respond to drug use? How has drug use changed over time?

Youth in Crisis? Young People, Crime and Justice Level 6

This unit examines a range of issues relating to young people's experiences of crime and the youth justice system. The concepts of young people and crime are both social constructions. Young people are both seen in a positive light as enthusiastic and pursuing moral ideals and demonised as amoral and anti-social yobs. Similarly, the history of crime control demonstrates that those behaviours subject to formal censure and punishment are not a given but depend on at what point in history the act was committed; who committed it; who or what was the target; and in what wider social context was the act committed. This unit critically considers how these two aspects come together throughout history to position young people and crime in various ways. 

Volunteering and Community Networking Level 6

You will undertake a volunteering opportunity for this unit. Theories of volunteering, policy and the community support this, and will be applied to your experience of volunteering. It also covers the voluntary sector (definitions, functions; funding); patterns of, and motivations for volunteering; issues of community, networking, social capital and social exclusion; social policy and the voluntary sector; political objectives and policy initiatives impacting on the voluntary sector; reflective practice and experiential learning as a means of enhancing employability.

Sociological Psychology Level 6

This unit explores the relationship between mind, self and society from a sociological perspective. It covers  the relationship between the self and society and proposes that the self is not innate but emerges in and through social interaction and our culturally-shared symbolic system. A sociological perspective conceives of identities as socially-bestowed, socially-sustained, socially-transformed and even socially-rescinded in and through interactional processes and contexts. Self is viewed as a constantly-evolving social process.

Media and Society Level 6

This unit examines the emergence and development of media forms and the impact of these on society and culture. Media forms including photography, film, television, recorded music and digital media are analysed

Crime and Media Level 6

This unit familiarises you with the complex relationship between crime and the media, especially the importance of media discourses in terms of representing crime and shaping how crime is understood and dealt with in contemporary society. It covers topics such as: 1. Media representations of crime, criminals and criminality 2. Media fascinations and obsessions with crime 3. The power of the media to shape understanding and governance of crime.

Undercover: Theory and Practice

This unit shall critically explore the tradition of covert research in the social sciences in four blocks. The first one explores key debates around ethics and the justification of deception and the governance of social research. Next, classic covert examples and their legacies shall be explored in detail. Thirdly, the contemporary Diaspora of covert research shall be explored from a range of case studies with particular emphasis drawn upon the night-time economy. The final block explores new developments within cyber and virtual ethnography and auto-ethnography with particular emphasis on the problems of lurking and recollected experiences.

The Politics of Imprisonment Level 6

This unit will critically examine the functions, purpose and justifications for the use of punishment and imprisonment. It will consider the legitimacy of the state's use of punishment and legitimacy. The unit will examine contemporary studies to develop a critical understanding of punishment, social control and imprisonment.

Diversity, Difference and (the limits of) Criminology
This unit will appraise both theoretical and evidence-based explanations to understand inequality within the delivery of Criminal Justice. It covers areas such as the concept of diversity and its relationship to criminology; differential treatment and the variable impact of crime on diverse and marginalised groups (including ethnicity, gender, social class, age, disability and sexuality); a critical appraisal of the limitations of criminology in addressing the 'crime' problem. Evaluating the impact of Criminal Justice responses to diversity.
EdLab Level 6 (30 credits)

EdLab units enable students to gain credit for project-based learning conducted in partnership with external practitioners, charities and social enterprises, educational providers and other workplaces. Their projects may be the development of products or resources, interventions or educational opportunities - but they will have real-world value, and lead to real-world impact with broad relevance to education. Tutored input for the unit will largely be facilitative and supportive, enabling students to develop, plan and evaluate projects. They will also be supported by a flexible lecture series which supports them with key aspects of project management - and which draw in guest speakers from external partner agencies, to share insights into their particular contexts and ways of working. The different levels of EdLab unit are distinguished by the extent to which students are expected to originate and take leadership over their projects and engagements. At level 6, students will take the lead in the negotiation, design and implementation of a project. They will work under the supervision of a tutor to liaise with an external community partner, to recruit and coordinate a cross-disciplinary team of students from other EdLab levels of study. Through their work, students will develop their understanding and skills in leadership and management as applied to educational innovation, together with specific expertise in the focus of the project and the context of its application. Students undertaking a EdLab unit at level 6 will be assessed according to the unit outcomes as they are translated onto the Level 6 University Standard Descriptors in the unit's assessment-specific marking criteria.

World Without Borders Level 6

Analyses key issues in transnational studies: e.g. gender, migration, livelihoods, violent conflicts/war.  Discussion of key issues concerning globalisation and transnationalism - e.g. uneven development; the local and the global; relative weight of the economic, social and cultural. The unit then goes on to examine selected, specific topics including: changes in women's status, sexuality and family relationships; globalisation and livelihoods; migration and multiculturalism; wars and violent conflicts.

Women's Lives: National and International Perspectives Level 6

An overview, comparison and analysis of gender and women's lives in varying societies. Issues include family, work, health, social change and women's movements. It covers topics such as: approaches to disadvantage and subordination; theoretical approaches to gender; discussions of social change and globalisation in relation to women's lives across the world.

The Culture of Britishness Level 6

This unit explores British identities and British culture(s) in the contemporary moment. The major focus is on the negotiation of 'Britishness' in a multi-ethnic and diverse society.

Extremism and Political Radicalism
The unit aims to conceptualise protest and political extremism, to analyse the causes of dissent and to explore state responses. It covers topics such as political radicalism; threat or progressive force in society? From Peterloo to Paris, understanding modern protest; Single issue politics and new social movements; Urban disorders and their causes and state responses; Politically motivated extremism, an overview; Nationalism, racism and white supremacist movements; Radical utopianism; Religious fundamentalism; Terrorism; and State Responses to extremism and politically motivated violence.
Consumption and Identity in Contemporary Society Level 6

This unit encourages you to reflect critically on contemporary consumer culture. The increasing commodification of everyday life is of chief consideration, along with the potential for alternative social, political and economic structures.

Body, Sexuality and Culture

This unit will focus on normative ideas concerning body shape, gender and desire. The unit engages with queer, transgender and feminist theories that aim to support a more benign understanding of sexuality and gender diversity. It covers topics such asconstructionism vs essentialism; the history of the body, gender and sexuality; sexual identities, queer theory, heteronormativity; transgender; bisexuality; body modification; BDSM; social movements and sexual politics; ethical conflicts about sexuality; HIV/AIDS; race and sexuality; normative ideas about beauty; disability; global sexual economies; queer diasporas.

Assessment weightings and contact hours

Study
Assessment

Placements options

The course offers many opportunities to enhance your employability:

Department of Sociology

Our Department of Sociology provides courses in the areas of sociology, criminology, global change and quantitative methods.

Its academic staff are actively involved in high-quality research and the department is home to the Policy and Evaluation Research Unit and Centre for Transitions in Society and Space, advising national and local policy-makers, and holding major roles in several significant national and European projects.

More about the department

Taught by experts

Your studies are supported by a team of committed and enthusiastic teachers and researchers, experts in their chosen field. We also work with external professionals, many of whom are Manchester Met alumni, to enhance your learning and appreciation of the wider subject.

Meet our expert staff

Fees

Tuition fees for the 2019/20 academic year are still being finalised for all courses. Please see our general guide to our standard undergraduate tuition fees.

Part-time students may take a maximum of 90 credits each academic year.

Additional costs

Specialist Costs

All of the books required for the course are available from the library. The University also has PC labs and a laptop loan service. However, many students choose to buy some of the core textbooks for the course and/or a laptop. Students may also need to print their assignments and other documents. Campus printing costs start from 5p per page. Estimated costs are £300 for a laptop up to £100 each year for books and printing.

Placement Costs

There are local field trips on some second and third year units (e.g. Manchester prison, police and museum), which incur travelling expenses but these are small as local public transport can be used. In their second year, students can choose to study abroad for one term or the full year. Study exchanges to a European partner university are arranged through the Erasmus programme and students can apply for help with travelling expenses and (if applicable) additional living costs - but these financial support funds are reviewed yearly and there is no guarantee of success. Students who go on study exchange overseas (either the US or Australia) are liable for all their travelling expenses and any additional living costs.

Professional Costs

Students can choose to join the BSA at any point in their study. This is not required though. The annual charge is identified for every year.

Other Costs

In the third year students may work with a partner organisation as part of an applied dissertation or a quantitative dissertation. This is an option. If students choose one of these units, local travel expenses in the Manchester city region would incur in that case.

Funding

For further information on financing your studies or information about whether you may qualify for one of our bursaries and scholarships, follow the links below:

Bursaries and scholarships

Money Matters

Want to know more?

How to apply

You can apply for this course through UCAS.

Apply now

UCAS code(s)

C268

Remember to use the correct institution code for Manchester Metropolitan University on your application: our institution code is M40

You can review our current Terms and Conditions before you make your application. If you are successful with your application, we will send you up to date information alongside your offer letter.

MANCHESTER IS YOUR CITY. BE PART OF IT.

Programme Review
Our programmes undergo an annual review and major review (normally at 6 year intervals) to ensure an up-to-date curriculum supported by the latest online learning technology. For further information on when we may make changes to our programmes, please see the changes section of our Terms and Conditions.

Important Notice
This online prospectus provides an overview of our programmes of study and the University. We regularly update our online prospectus so that our published course information is accurate. Please check back to the online prospectus before making an application to us to access the most up to date information for your chosen course of study.

Confirmation of Regulator
The Office for Students is the principal regulator for the University. For further information about their role please visit the Office for Students website. You can find out more about our courses including our approach to timetabling, course structures and assessment and feedback on our website.

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